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Successful Performance Reviews

Employee performance reviews are often awkward and uncomfortable. Feedback, whether positive or critical, can be difficult to deliver or accept. Yet providing feedback to employees is an important way for a company’s leadership to guide the organization. Employees also want feedback; employee engagement increases when employees get more feedback, more frequently; and, they’re less likely to quit.

Tips for Managers

  1. Review expectations. Take a look at the feedback employees received last year, along with their self-appraisals and development plans.
  2. Evaluate performance. Think about how well they’ve done that work. Use your own opinion of work you’ve seen, plus updates from the employee, comments from their coworkers and input from other managers and other departments. Take note of any awards or recognitions the employee received.
  3. Plan for next year. Identify successes as well as opportunities for improvement, and set objectives for the next year. Outline a development plan that will help achieve employee success.
  4. Conduct the review. Set aside enough time for a thorough conversation. Allow the employee to respond and react to your feedback. Make sure the employee agrees with the goals you set for the next year.
  5. Follow up. Don’t file the review away until next year’s annual review. Check in with employees throughout the year to make sure they’re making progress on their development plan. Take the opportunity to offer employee recognition and rewards for improvements and achievements throughout the year.
  6. Consider continuous feedback. A new approach taking root in forward-looking organizations like GE and throughout silicon valley is known as “continuous feedback”. Continuous feedback favors frequent check-ins throughout the year over stressful annual reviews and allows you to identify potential problems and address sources of dissatisfaction or disengagement quickly, so they don’t linger and affect performance.

Tips for Employees

  1. Review expectations. Look over the expectations that were established last year, based on your job description, review and development plan. Review the work you achieved as well as the difficulties experienced along the way; this is important because managers often see only the finished work product and don’t understand the challenges that had to be overcome to produce it.
  2. Evaluate performance. Consider what you did well during the year and where you fell short, as well as what you liked working on and what you didn’t enjoy.
  3. Plan for next year. Consider your long-term career goals and what skills you would like to develop over the next year to help move you along that path.
  4. Participate in the review. Take advantage of this time with your managers. If you disagree with their assessment, share your opinion respectfully. Make sure you agree with the development plan and goals for next year.
  5. Follow up. Don’t file the review away until next year’s annual review. Take action on the development plan, and let your manager know how things are going throughout the year. Treat your manager’s time as a resource that can help you achieve career success.
  6. Embrace and encourage continuous feedback. If your manager and HR department are open to it, encourage and embrace continuous feedback and foster open lines of communication between you and your manager all throughout the year.

Because reviews feel uncomfortable, both managers and employees often simply hurry through them, just to get them over with. Taking that approach technically meets corporate requirements to conduct a review, but it loses all the benefits. When managers and employees take time to prepare before the review, have an open and honest discussion, and then use the feedback to make real changes, performance reviews become a key factor in increasing employee motivation and driving employee and business success.

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The State of Employee Engagement

How happy and engaged are our employees? It’s an important question that every business should want to know the answer to. We hate to break it to you, but according to our latest employee survey, 51% of employees are not happy at work. What does that mean for your business? The less happy and engaged your employees are, the less productive your business will be as a whole. Start focusing on how to make your employees more engaged for better business outcomes. Take at a look at the current state of employee engagement and see what you can do to make it better.

Focus on your mission and vision
Greatness Infographic Mission and Vision

It’s surprising that a whopping 61% of employees don’t know their company’s mission. A mission and vision statement is essentially a summary of the aims, values and direction of your company. Knowing and embracing the company’s mission helps provide employees with a sense of purpose and with motivation to succeed. But if your employees aren’t aligned to, or even aware of, your company’s mission and vision, how can you expect them to move forward as a whole towards the same goals? Focus on your company’s mission and vision, and start strategizing on how to build more awareness of those core, guiding principles within your organization.

Emphasize shared cultural values
Greatness Infographic Culture

Not only are a majority of employees unaware of their company’s mission and vision, but apparently they are also oblivious to their company’s cultural values. Values are important because they help define company culture and reflect what an organization ultimately cares about. You want your employees to embrace your company’s values because by having a personal and emotional connection to what they do, they gain a sense of importance and motivation behind their work. But as our research shows, shared culture can only go so far towards improving overall levels of engagement.

Encourage leadership to nurture trust
Greatness Infographic Leadership Statistic

We’ve all heard the saying, “People join companies, but leave bad managers.” One constant that remains as a contributing factor to employee disengagement is poor leadership. Only 45% of employees trust their company’s leadership and half don’t expect to be in their current job just one year from now. This represents an obvious disconnect between employees and their work, and especially between employees and leadership. According to a Careerbuilder.com study cited in a Wharton management blog, 76% of full-time workers, while not actively looking for a new job, would leave their current workplace if the right opportunity came along. Don’t lose great talent because of a lack of trust in leadership and in their vision for the future. Reassure your employees that your company and leadership team cares about them, as both workers and human beings. Put the emphasis on showing them respect and trust in what they do.

Reward and recognize employees
Greatness Infographic Rewards and Recognition

Results clearly show that employees have a deep desire for employee recognition. A massive 93% hope to be recognized at least quarterly, if not more. Why is it important to recognize employees for their hard work? According to the Psychologically Healthy Workplace Program, employees who feel valued by their employer are 60% more likely to be motivated to do their very best at work. A quick recognition, whether from management or a peer, goes a long way and can boost employee engagement by up to 22%. Start recognizing and rewarding your employees for jobs well done and witness the positive impact it makes. Today’s rewards and recognition programs go way beyond tired old plaques and paperweights and should be based on a social media model to encourage the highest levels of adoption and active use. They should link to employees’ existing social networks and other common communications platforms like Slack and Jabber, offer point-based rewards so employees can choose items that are meaningful to them, and most importantly, they should serve to reinforce company values and encourage desired business results.

To learn more, download The Greatness Gap: The State of Employee Disengagement.

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Employee Experience

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“There are only three measurements that tell you nearly everything you need to know about your organization’s overall performance: employee engagement, customer satisfaction, and cash flow. It goes without saying that no company, small or large, can win over the long run without energized employees who believe in the mission and understand how to achieve it.” – Jack Welch, former CEO of GE

The recent history of work has been characterized by increasing levels of automation, greater demands on workers’ time and an overall breaking down of the walls between work and home life. But in our race towards organizational productivity we’ve added so many layered and complicated processes – along with countless devices, tools and platforms – that we’ve ended up completely dehumanizing the workplace. Employees are often termed as mere resources or just another headcount on spreadsheets; they’ve become easily replaceable in the eyes of poor leadership.

This begs the question, what do our jobs mean to us? The reality is that only a small number of people believe that our work drives our lives and defines who we are. The majority consider our jobs to be a means to an end, rather than an end in itself – and justifiably so. It is this silent majority of the workforce that we need to keep engaged by improving and humanizing their experience in the workplace. It is time we start thinking beyond engagement and try to learn what people really want from their job and the workplace.

A decade ago there was a huge push by major businesses to concentrate on customers and gather and act on their feedback. CX, or customer experience, is the sum of all touch points that the customer has with an organization. Starting with Awareness, the first step on the customer journey, then Research, Consideration, Purchase and finally, Service and Support (or some variation thereof), CX encompasses the entire lifecycle of a customer’s experience. Companies spend millions of dollars on nurturing their customers because they know that nurturing and subsequently up-selling to current customers is cheaper than acquiring new ones.

Similarly, EX, or employee experience, is the sum total of the interactions employees have with their organization – from recruitment, to onboarding and beyond. EX is measured by the individual’s experience at all points of contact as measured against the individual’s expectations, and has an effect on engagement, productivity, happiness, personal development, and advocacy. Employees who believe that management is concerned about them as a whole person – not just an employee – are hands down more productive, satisfied, and fulfilled with their job. It’s simple: more satisfied employees equate to more satisfied customers, which leads to more revenue for your business. Attrition is expensive and it is time we start focusing on EX in order to make people want to stay and be part of something bigger than themselves.

Conventional wisdom has linked an employee’s engagement and overall experience to the interactions they have with their immediate manager and the group of people they work with on a daily basis. While that is generally true, we thought it would be helpful to compile a list of the top 6 ways you can go beyond engagement, focus on the full employee experience, and humanize your workplace.
 
1. Open and transparent interactions

open and transparent

In a world where technology has transformed our most basic forms of communication and connection, workplaces have struggled to keep up. Today’s employees seek workplaces where openness is the default for communication, where their voice is heard, and where they feel significant, connected and recognized for their contributions. To create such an environment, employers need to foster a culture where people feel empowered to share feedback, suggestions and recognitions. In this way, employers can magnify the positive interactions among their employees and give senior leadership a view into how their workforce interacts with each other and the amazing work that comes as a result. But to begin with, employers must remember that their employees are not just numbers on a spreadsheet or in an HR system – they are the heart of the company culture.

2. Flexible working hours

flexible working hours

There’s been a lot said about organizations needing to offer more flexible hours to employees and the ability to work remotely. We can’t stress this enough. People have lives outside of work and the easiest way for an organization to show their employees that they care about their well-being and work/life balance is to offer a flexible schedule. That being said, you can always suggest core availability hours, say 11 AM to 3 PM, where you can expect them to be available for collaborating with their teams. If you trust your employees to make the right choice, they will make it 9 times out of 10.

3. Gamification

gamificationAs demonstrated by the recent Pokémon Go craze, or the popularity of Fitbits and “counting your steps,” it’s clear that gamification is a powerful motivational force. What scores of fitness gurus, gym sales people and even spousal encouragement couldn’t force people to do despite years of trying, Pokémon Go has been able to achieve in a matter of weeks. It has managed to get users outside and walking. So how can we bring gamification to the employee experience to produce long-term engagement? The key is to not just to rely on once a year employee engagement events or retreats to magically increase engagement. Bring the gamification into the day-to-day. Encourage little competitions amongst teams or departments and reward achievements continually. Have mini events every month to bring people together. Encourage employees to compete both against each other and their own prior results to keep them motivated. Gamification builds the company culture and is just another fun activity for employees to look forward to and participate in.

4. Recognition and rewards

rewards and recognitionEngaging employees is no easy feat. Recent Gallup surveys have showed that employee engagement has held steady at only 30% of the US workforce for the last few years, trending slightly upwards over the last couple of years. But a proven method for improving engagement levels does exist. Dr. Bob Nelson, best-selling author and a leading authority on employee recognition, has found that, “Organizations that have a ‘culture of recognition’ have employees who report they are five times more likely to feel valued, seven times more likely to stay with the company, six times more likely to invest in the company, and eleven times more likely to feel completely committed in their jobs, which has been shown to account for 57 percent greater effort on the part of employees.” And according to the Achievers 2015 Workforce Survey (revealed in our Getting to Greatness: The Route to Employee Engagement infographic), 57% of employees don’t feel recognized for their progress at work while 93% hope to be recognized at least quarterly, it not more. So don’t miss the opportunity to recognize and reward great performance at work. Through the right rewards and recognition program, tied to real business goals, companies are able to see a direct impact on revenue, retention and customer satisfaction. The value of recognition and engagement is stronger than ever, with a 1% increase in employee engagement equating to an additional .6% growth in sales. But it isn’t just about the bottom line, it’s about making employees feel valued, happy and engaged.

5. Eliminate email

eliminate emailThis will most likely be the most controversial suggestion I make, but I am not alone in recommending that employers try to eliminate email, or at least scale back its use as the primary means of communication within teams. There are a slew of group messaging and collaboration tools like Slack, HipChat and Jabber that empower teams to have effective real-time communications. Leaders can join or subscribe to conversations that they are interested in rather than having to be copied on every email sent by their team members. This is one of the many ways that leaders can encourage employees to get their work done more efficiently while not being too invasive and showing trust in their workforce. Creating a natural, trusting atmosphere for employees goes further than you think.

 

6. Pay parity

pay parityFinally, it is critical that organizations pay their employees fairly. For many years it was clear that there existed large disparities in compensation based on an employee’s gender, ethnicity or personality type. Do not compensate two people who are doing the same work different salaries just because you can, or because they won’t ask. Be fair. For far too long companies relied on people not talking about their salaries with co-workers as cover for unequal treatment. Equal and fair pay is not only ethically sound, it is sound business practice. When employees know they are getting paid fairly they will be more engaged and stay with your company for the long haul, because it’s a place where they feel valued and appreciated.

Based on a recent Gallup poll, an estimated $11 Billion is lost annually due to employee turnover and 71% of the workforce around the world is disengaged. Employee experience is the next business frontier that needs to be fully explored and optimized, and the best way to start improving the employee experience is by making your workforce feel appreciated, recognized, connected and empowered to make a difference.

Are you ready to transform your workplace by focusing on the full employee experience? Download our white paper The Greatness Gap: The State of Employee Disengagement to learn more about how critical employee engagement is for your business and what you can do to improve EX today.

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Amit K. HeadshotAmit Kaura (@tweets_bitter) is a technology leader at Achievers and is helping build the next generation Employee Success Platform. Achievers’ employee recognition and rewards platform provides digital systems for sharing recognitions, feedback, and suggestions. The platform allows you to humanize the workplace by digitizing and thus magnifying the positive interactions among the workforce.

 

Event Activities at ACE 2016

Are you ready to change the way the world works? Considering a 1% increase in employee engagement equates to an additional .6% growth in sales for companies, it’s not surprising that businesses are eager to find ways to improve in this area. Additionally, Gallup has found that companies in the top quartile of employee engagement see real measures of business success (compared to bottom-quartile organizations), including:

  • 21% higher productivity
  • 22% higher profitability
  • 41% higher quality
  • 48% fewer safety incidents
  • 37% reduced absenteeism

As many forward-looking companies are finding, one of the top ways of increasing engagement is through the implementation of a company-wide recognition and rewards program. But with such a premium on boosting employee engagement, it is important to stay on top of the latest developments and connect with other practitioners who have achieved success in this area.

With that in mind, we’d like to invite you to come join us at our biggest event of the year, Achievers Customer Experience (ACE) 2016! This dynamic 2-day conference takes place September 13-14 in the heart of downtown Toronto. Join hundreds of HR executives, practitioners and thought leaders to focus on employee engagement and come away with practical advice and solutions for implementing, or improving, your own engagement program.

The event kicks off with the 6th Annual Achievers 50 Most Engaged Workplaces Awards Gala, and features inspirational keynotes, educational sessions and real-world examples of program success. Don’t miss out on the fun! Join us to network with a Who’s Who of top performers and thought leaders in the HR and employee engagement space.

Jump in on ACE’s 3 tracks

This year, our agenda is broken into 3 tracks all focused on how to build upon and improve employee engagement. Plan to enjoy a full lineup of sessions and keynotes aligned around the following tracks:

  1. Aspire to Greatness
    Take your engagement game to the next level! Learn from some of the most forward-thinking minds in HR and join industry leaders as they offer expert advice on employee engagement.
  2. Achieve Brilliance
    Listen in on success stories and strategies from some of our top customers, and learn how they elevated their employee engagement programs to achieve the desired results.
  3. Accelerate Your Program
    Whether you’re an expert on our software, or a complete beginner, take a deep dive into the Achievers platform and learn how it can boost your employee engagement.

Be inspired by this year’s keynote lineup

Leave ACE 2016 feeling inspired and motivated by our amazing lineup of keynote speakers. This year, save your seat and hear from renowned guest speakers and industry leaders, including:

Mel Robbins ACE 2016 Speaker

Mel Robbins
Motivational Speaker, CNN Commentator, and Coach

Mel Robbins started her career as a criminal defense attorney and went on to launch and sell a retail and internet technology company. She has led multi-year coaching programs, including one for Johnson & Johnson, and has hosted award-winning shows for FOX, A&E, Cox Media Group and now CNN. Her TEDx Talk, titled How To Stop Screwing Yourself Over, has over 3 million views and her book, titled Stop Saying You’re Fine, is a business bestseller.

Spencer West ACE 2016 Speaker

Spencer West
Social Activist and World Change Warrior

Spencer West shares his personal journey after losing both legs from the pelvis down at the age of five to last year, when he climbed and summited Mount Kilimanjaro using his hands and wheelchair. He is a bestselling author who wrote the book Standing Tall: My Journey and star of the documentary Redefine Possible: The Story of Spencer West, which debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2012.

Joan Lunden ACE 2016 Speaker

Joan Lunden
Journalist, Author, and Television Host

As the longest running host ever on early morning TV, for nearly 2 decades Lunden greeted viewers each morning on Good Morning America bringing insight to the day’s top stories. An award-winning journalist, bestselling author, motivational speaker, women’s health & wellness advocate, and mom of seven – she continues to be one of America’s most recognized and trusted personalities.

 

In addition to our inspirational keynote speakers, we will also be featuring provocative and stimulating breakout sessions with HR thought leaders, including:

  • Andrew Sykes, Founder and President, Habits at Work: Join Andrew Sykes, President of Habits at Work, to understand the role of pivotal habits in creating thriving (healthy, happy and secure) employees and the “dose value” of these pivotal habits on performance at work.
  • Aimee Lucas, Customer Experience Transformist & Vice President, Temkin Group: Organizations that want to deliver a great customer experience (CX) won’t succeed without an engaged workforce. Aimee will explore the connection between CX and employee engagement (EE) and share proven EE tactics that have yielded positive CX results at other organizations—including how employees are incented, recognized, and celebrated.
  • Elaine Orler, CEO & Founder, Talent Board: If candidate experience isn’t a top priority for your organization, it should be. A great candidate experience – transparent and insightful – can have a significant impact on an organization. Elaine Orler will share her insights into emerging trends for 2016 through case studies that successfully implement superior candidate experience practices. Attendees will learn how to calculate the estimated costs of candidate resentment for your organization and explore the impact of generational differences on the candidate experience.

The night before ACE 2016 kicks off with its three powerful session tracks and thought-provoking and inspiring keynote speakers, you can get in the spirit at the 6th Annual Achievers 50 Most Engaged Workplaces Awards Gala. The Achievers 50 Most Engaged Workplaces Awards recognizes top employers in North America that display leadership and innovation in engaging their workplaces. Past winners have included top brands, such as KPMG, Zappos.com, Netsuite, Smart & Final, and Ericsson.

Stay tuned for more updates and details on ACE 2016, as well as a series of guest blogs from featured customers and speakers at this year’s event. Also, don’t forget to join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #AACE16 and by following @Achievers on Twitter.

Register now so you don’t miss out on the fun at ACE 2016. See you in Toronto!

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Employee rewards program

An increasing number of workplaces are integrating sophisticated and strategic employee rewards programs to motivate employees and show appreciation for their hard work. Unfortunately, however, some of these companies are still giving rewards that their employees don’t actually want. Company-branded t-shirts, coffee mugs, and mouse pads often go straight from workplace to thrift store. To makes sure your rewards program has the positive effects you’re looking for, you need to give your employees the rewards they actually want. Here are four fail-safe tips for recognizing your employees in a way that they’ll truly appreciate:

  1. Establish a rewards marketplace

Give your employees the ability to “shop” from a marketplace full of items they actually want or need. Many recognition and rewards platforms, including the Achievers platform, have marketplaces built into the product. This allows employees to apply their awards money to anything from an espresso maker, to designer bags, to a new iPad. When they experience the excitement of shopping, it will help reinforce the positive feelings they have for your organization.

  1. Award team prizes

If it took teamwork to deliver the outstanding results that you’re rewarding, you’ll nurture the group’s sense of unity if you give a shared prize to the entire team. Underwriting a team dinner out or providing tickets to an event that team members can enjoy together is a great way to build a powerful sense of group identification.

  1. Give gift cards

No award is exactly right for every employee; a diverse workforce means that your scope of rewards and recognition needs to be equally diverse. Prepaid gift cards are the perfect way to provide precisely the reward that your worker will appreciate the most. A survey from the Incentive Research Foundation found that 83 percent of recipients prefer receiving gift cards to cash. The reason likely lies in the fact that gift cards are more personal than cash, and they also enable people to experience guilt-free shopping.

Employee rewards programs provide a powerful force to keep your workforce engaged. Choosing the right rewards lets you take full advantage of this important aspect of your company culture.

manager and employee recognition

Employee recognition is foundational in building your company’s long-term success. Employees who feel genuinely appreciated stay more engaged in their work because they understand the value that they bring to their team and the organization. This greater level of engagement will, in turn, stimulate higher productivity, a more pleasant workplace climate and much lower staff turnover rates. All these benefits translate into cost-effectiveness and a stronger bottom line for your business.

Team leaders are essential to your recognition program

In some cases, you may have team leaders who developed their management style before the importance of workplace recognition was widely understood. They may not feel that formal appreciation is relevant to the workplace, and may figure that receiving a regular paycheck is as much recognition as any worker needs. Here are three tips for how HR (and/or other leaders) can bring these managers on board and help them see the bottom-line value of giving positive feedback:

  1. Take recognition to a higher level

Effective recognition for good performance is not a concept limited to lower-level or line workers. As Firebrand founder and CEO Jeremy Goldman writes, “What do your boss, colleagues, and office janitor have in common? All of them want to feel appreciated.” By recognizing and rewarding team leaders for increasing the number of formal appreciations they offer their direct reports, you can jump-start positive change throughout all levels of your organization.

  1. Hold an offsite retreat

This may initially be a tough sell to managers already working hard to get through each day’s tasks, but it’s a plan well worth pursuing. Stepping outside the daily hustle is essential in order to think about cultural changes such as placing higher value on workplace recognition. Changes in outlook require thoughtful consideration; they don’t magically emerge from being placed on the latest “to-do” list. Additionally, getting out of the office helps task-oriented managers gain a clearer view of why interpersonal workplace relationships matter.

  1. Invest in leadership development

A good way to approach a manager who isn’t supportive of employee recognition is to offer an opportunity for further training. Anyone who is serious about their own career will be eager to pursue a high-quality educational opportunity, especially if it’s underwritten by their company. Good leadership training programs should include a substantial emphasis on the why’s and how’s of employee recognition, and your managers may bring back new insights and techniques you hadn’t even considered.

Building a culture that recognizes employees is part of maintaining your company’s competitive edge. Supervisors and team leaders will be your strongest change agents once you help them recognize the importance of their role.

 

boomerang employees

“Boomerang” employees are workers who leave an organization and then come back a few months (or even years) later. Depending on their reasons for leaving and what they’ve been doing in the meantime, these returning employees can bring major benefits to your company. Here are three big benefits to re-hiring employees, and a few cautionary notes:

  1. Improved morale

Talented employees are constantly being recruited and headhunted by your competitors, and it can be painful to watch these workers jump ship for a more tempting situation. When they return, it sends the validating message that your organization is actually the best thing going right now. According to Winston Binch, chief digital officer and partner at Deutsch LA, “Our boomerangs prove to us all that we’re on to something, that what we’re doing is noteworthy, and it’s worth sticking around for.”

  1. Cost savings

It requires fewer resources to source, recruit, and onboard a former employee than someone who’s entirely unfamiliar with your company. You may not even need to use a recruiter, and a boomerang employee can save you time and money by being ready to hit the ground running.

  1. Fresh skills and energy

If your employee left their position with your company in order to pursue a passion, gain new skills, or try their hand at building a startup, they will have grown and changed during their absence. When they return, they are likely to bring fresh talent, knowledge, and networking contacts to your company.

Warning signs

While hiring boomerang employees is usually a net plus, it’s important to be aware of potential pitfalls in this practice. If an employee left due to personality conflicts, and the problems stopped as soon as they were gone, it’s not worth taking a chance on reintroducing a source of disruption. Likewise, if the employee was not performing exceptionally well at the time of departure, they need to have a clear explanation regarding what factors interfered with their previous performance, and why things are different this time.

As companies recognize the benefits that boomerang employees bring with them, these returning workers are being welcomed back in far greater numbers than they once were. Seventy-six percent of HR professionals note that they have become more open to re-hiring previous employees than they used to be, while 56 percent say they now give high priority to former employees who left in good standing, according to a Kronos survey. Judicious rehiring of good workers is increasingly recognized as a way to bring fresh energy and value to your organization.

Employee Recognition

Competition for top talent is intense, and your highly skilled workers are constantly being wooed by recruiters from other organizations. To build a strong company culture and foster employee engagement and alignment, you need to recognize their contributions in a way that makes them feel genuinely appreciated. The acronym R.I.S.E. is a helpful way to summarize these four employee recognition best practices:

R: Regular

People should recognize their colleagues on a consistent basis. Consistently offering appreciation for good performance sets up a reliable feedback system, developing an automatic expectation of excellence in your organization.

I: Immediate

To best reinforce behavior, recognitions should be given in a timely way. It’s a basic truism of psychology that people learn fastest when they receive prompt responses as a result of their actions. This principle is especially relevant when you have younger employees, because millennials have grown up in the fast-paced digital era and have come to expect immediate interactions with their world.

S: Specific

Recognitions should name exactly what the person did that impressed you or that reflected company values. Random or overly general words of praise can actually backfire on you and sound hollow to your workers. As Meghan Biro writes in Forbes, “Recognition should match effort and results, or it loses meaning.”

E: Encouraging

Recognitions should provide positive encouragement. This statement may sound obvious at first, but it refers to the fact that each employee should receive recognition in the form that they find most personally meaningful. In their NYTimes bestselling book, The 5 Languages for Appreciation in the Workplace, authors Gary Chapman and Paul White identify different approaches to employee appreciation. These include words of affirmation and tangible gifts. The authors point out that these methods are all similar to the ways in which parents instill a sense of value in children, although the employer-employee relationship is very different from a parental one.

The need for appreciation is fundamental to every human being. When this need is understood and fulfilled in a workplace context, it creates a positive environment in which employees feel motivated to excel.

ACE 2016 Event

If you haven’t heard the news already, Achievers Customer Experience (ACE), our annual employee engagement and user conference, will be in Toronto this September! We provide our attendees with a compelling lineup of speakers who are experts in engagement, rewards and recognition, HR technology, and the Achievers platform.

Register for ACE Now!               

We are very excited to announce this year’s keynote speakers:

Joan Lunden

Fostering Leadership and Achieving Dreams

Joan Lunden

For over 3 decades, Joan Lunden has been a trusted voice in American homes. As the longest running host ever on early morning TV, for nearly two decades Joan greeted viewers each morning on Good Morning America bringing insight to the day’s top stories.

In June of 2014, Joan was diagnosed with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer, which required chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation. Joan made a decision to take her battle public and has since shared her journey through cancer treatment with the world, becoming a prominent voice in the breast cancer community.

An award-winning journalist, bestselling author, motivational speaker, woman’s health & wellness advocate, and mom of seven – she continues to be one of America’s most recognized and trusted personalities.

At ACE 2016, she’ll be sharing her secrets to becoming a great leader and achieving your goals.

 

 

 

Mel Robbins

The 5 Second Rule: Achieve Breakthrough Performance in your Career and Life

Mel Robbins

Mel Robbins is a TV personality, coach, author, and speaker, and is currently one of CNN’s most popular on-air commentators and opinion writers. Mel has shared her expertise in human behavior on Good Morning America, Dr. Phil, Dr. Oz, Oprah, The Today Show, and Fox News. She was named America’s Outstanding News Talkshow Host at the 2014 Gracie Awards.

Her TEDx Talk on “How to Stop Screwing Yourself Over” has over 3 million views, and her book on the brain and productivity, “Stop Saying You’re Fine”, is a business bestseller that has been translated into four languages.

Mel will give the ACE audience her strategies for improving your performance both in and out of the office.

 

Spencer West

Redefine Possible: Lessons for Tackling Mountains in the Corporate World

Spencer West

Spencer West’s charisma and dynamism captivate audiences every time he speaks. Whether addressing corporate leaders, nonprofits, or the education world, listeners are mesmerized as Spencer describes his journey after losing both legs from the pelvis down at the age of five to last year, when he climbed, and summited, Mount Kilimanjaro using his hands and wheelchair.

Spencer is a top-ranked keynoter, author of the best-selling book “Standing Tall: My Journey”, and star of the documentary “Redefine Possible: The Story of Spencer West”, which debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2012.

At ACE, Spencer will teach attendees his approach to overcoming seemingly insurmountable obstacles – including those we encounter in the workplace.

Register for ACE Now!