Promotion Criteria

7 signals that your employee is ready for a promotion

Filling an open position with an outside hire takes time. According to Indeed, if a position isn’t filled within one month, there’s a 57 percent chance it will take three months or longer to find the right hire. Promoting an inside candidate is a great solution, as long as the employee is up to the new job. Here are seven promotion criteria to use when deciding whether your employees are ready to move to the next level:

  1. They’ve asked for one

Asking for a promotion doesn’t guarantee ability or employee success, but it’s a sign that they want the new position. They’ll be motivated and eager to take on the new challenges.

  1. They exceed their responsibilities

Promotion candidates should excel in their current responsibilities, but they should also stretch beyond the tasks assigned to them — without being asked. They view the success of the project as their responsibility and step up to make sure that happens.

  1. They’re recognized as leaders

Just because employees don’t have direct reports doesn’t mean they can’t act like leaders. If others on the team turn to a particular employee for insight and guidance, he or she has already taken on a leadership role.

  1. They’re curious

Employees who demonstrate interest in the big picture beyond their projects and task assignments are ready to start thinking about the bigger questions involved in running a project or business.

  1. They create solutions

Some employees report problems up the management chain. Employees with leadership ability report the problem as well as the solution they created to address it.

  1. They ask for feedback

Most people dread performance reviews, and many take offense at even constructive criticism. If an employee asks for feedback and applies it to improving his or her performance, that person has the motivation to develop new skills.

  1. They manage themselves

If your employee understands the purpose of the business and project so well that he or she doesn’t need to wait for instructions on what to do next, that person can take more responsibility and use that insight to manage and guide others.

Promoting from within can boost employee morale, not only for the promoted employees but also for peers who know that career advancement is real. They’ll be motivated to strive for promotions of their own. That’s good for your business as well as for your employee engagement levels.

 

HR skills

3 HR skills you need to be successful

The business landscape is evolving rapidly, and HR skills that were once highly prized are becoming obsolete. HR professionals no longer spend their time keeping records, and new technology has transformed how employees engage with their work. The best HR leaders have traded in paper pushing and business-as-usual management methods and have instead become strategic business partners, actively contributing to company growth. In order to keep their seat at the table, HR professionals have had to take advantage of the rich employee data that’s at their disposal. They’re having to become experts in data analysis and a wide variety of HR information systems so that they can improve employee success, forecast changes in human capital, and make informed recommendations for policy and process changes. If you want to be an incredible HR leader, these are the skills you’ll need to adopt moving forward:

Tech-savvy vs. traditional methods

The days of an exclusively on-site workforce are a thing of the past. Mobile technology and changing workforce demographics have transformed where and how employees work. Some research predicts that 70% of mobile professionals will conduct their work on personal smart devices by 2018, and HR leaders are embracing this change. Instead of insisting on traditional methods for getting the job done – eight hours in the office in front of a computer – forward-thinking HR professionals are getting comfortable with new technology and incorporating it into business processes.

Strategic partner vs. record keeper

In the early days of the HR function, primary responsibilities included processing basic transactions. Changes in employee status, modifications to benefits, and corrections to personal information were all handled by hand. New technology has made it possible for staff members and their managers to handle these adjustments independently, which mean HR professionals can explore new ways to add value.

The best HR leaders concentrate their efforts on strategic partnership, using evidence gathered through data analysis to provide strategic recommendations to the business. Incredible HR leaders design proactive initiatives to make the workforce stronger, rather than simply reacting to events that have already occurred in the workplace. These efforts are being recognized by executive leadership. In fact, a KPMG study found that 85 percent of business leaders agree: HR plays a strong role in meeting strategic goals.

Analytical vs. business as usual

Of course, adding value through strategic partnership only works when HR leaders develop their skills in data analysis. As new technology permits the gathering of detailed business and employee performance, smart HR professionals are spending their time looking for connections that will strengthen the business. Research has determined that 62 percent of organizations are already using advanced analytics to find people/profit connections, and 70 percent of survey participants plan to expand their use of data analysis tools over the next three years.

Today’s truly exceptional HR leaders are prepared to act as tech-savvy strategic partners, with a focus on developing outstanding data analysis skills. The transformation of HR promises opportunities for employee success in every HR specialty.