Attract Top Talent With Unbeatable Culture

Harness Your Great Culture as a Hiring Tool

By: Melissa Ricker

When it comes to attracting talent, competitive pay and great benefits are two big factors. But there’s a third factor that’s high on the list: company culture. For some professionals, the opportunity to work for an organization with a productive culture that aligns with their own values and work style may even outweigh compensation when it comes to deciding on whether to take a particular job. So if you’ve put in the work to build a great company culture, it should be front and center during as you seek to find the best employees.

Step 1: Have a Great Company Culture

Ideally, your company’s founding leadership fostered a desirable corporate culture from the outset. However, even if that’s not the case, it is never too late to drive change. Culture is the glue that holds an organization together, and the type of glue you use matters. What does your company stand for? What are your values? What is your vision? What do you want your company’s reputation to be? A culture cannot simply be defined in an email and handed down to employees. Sure it has to start at the top so everyone knows that culture is a priority, but everyone needs to buy in and believe that their needs are being met in order for the culture to take root. Every employee is expected to live the values, lead by example, and stop behaviors that violate company standards and shared cultural norms.

Elements of strong corporate culture should revolve around the following traits:

  • Teamwork. Build a team instead of a group of people. Collaboration should be valued.
  • Integrity. Without honesty and integrity, a company is destined to fail. A culture should embed the expectation that all employees act ethically and lawfully.
  • Safety. A company must protect the health and safety of its people. Employees need to feel safe and know that the company will provide them the right tools to do their jobs.
  • People Focused. One of the easiest ways to lose top talent is to fail to develop them. Passionate employees want to continually grow and develop their career. They want to reach their full potential, and they need their employers to empower them to do so.
  • Customer Success. Businesses should strive to be customer centered by building close partnerships with their customers and having a strong desire for their customers to be successful.
  • Quality. Employees should value high-quality workmanship. Shortcuts should not be allowed. The company’s reputation rides on the quality of each individual product that is delivered.
  • Innovation. Creativity and intellectual risk taking should be encouraged to continually move forward in an ever-changing market.
  • Recognition. Recognizing both individual and shared accomplishments, especially when they reinforce shared values, is one of the most effective ways to define a positive, shared, corporate culture.

Once your culture is defined, it needs to be deeply embedded and reinforced. Is your culture so rooted in the organization that it is woven into meetings, company emails, and informal conversations? Do you have a formal recognition program in place that reinforces shared company values and bolsters corporate culture?

Step 2: Use Your Culture to Attract Talent

Once you have a well-defined culture in place, you can use it to recruit top-notch employees. A great corporate culture will cause employees to seek you out. People want to work where they are valued and where their hard work and contributions to the success of the company are recognized. So it only makes sense to hire people whose personal values mesh with the values you desire. According to the Harvard Business Review, “If you assess cultural fit in your recruiting process, you will hire professionals who will flourish in their new role, drive long-term growth and success for your organization, and ultimately save you time and money.” Here is how to do it.

Advertise Your Culture

Your website, your publications and your job postings should advertise your company culture. When a potential candidate walks into the lobby and through the office building for an interview, is the culture you aspire to evident right away?

Your company’s mission statement and values should be promoted and clearly visible all over your place of business. Do not make potential candidates guess as to the type of person you are looking to hire, or what values they should share.

Furthermore, don’t just tell potential candidates about your company culture with words. Show them. Encourage team members to promote your company’s culture on social media. Post pictures of company outings, community service projects, and successful project completions. During interviews, give candidates a chance to talk to other employees. Take them on a tour and point out behaviors that exemplify your culture. Give job seekers a chance to see what it would be like to work for your company.

Interview for Cultural Fit

The interview is your opportunity to determine if the potential new employee is a cultural fit for your business. The most intellectual person on the planet with pages and pages of credentials may not thrive in your company if they do not model the values you are looking for. It is essential that you ask questions to help you determine if someone will reflect the behaviors and beliefs that are crucial to your corporate culture.

  • What drew you to this company?
  • Why do you want to work here?
  • What are the things on your life that matter most to you?
  • How would you describe a desirable Work-Life balance?
  • How would you describe the perfect company culture?

Having a strong corporate culture is not only important, it is strategic. Savvy business leaders know that the right culture attracts the best employees. Talented and career driven individuals seek out companies that embody the values that are important to them. The bottom line is that when an employee’s personal culture aligns with the corporate culture, the company will prosper. Use your corporate culture as a marketing tool and watch your business blossom in success.

To learn more, download the eBook All for One and One for All: Uniting a Global Workforce with Company Culture.

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About Melissa Ricker

Melissa RickerMelissa Ricker covers business and career topics for JobHero.

 

 

 

Measuring Employee Performance

5 Performance Measurement Myths

The question of how to measure employee performance represents one of the last vestiges of old-school HR methodology. Today’s workforce is digitally transformed, highly social and mobile, made up of multiple generations, and collaborating across virtual and global locations. There has been a profound shift in the workforce away from hierarchical, top-down organizations towards teams and collaboration, where having a culture of recognition can drive engagement and results far more effectively than infrequent reviews handed down from on high by management.

We all want the best hires and to lure the top talent. But once on board, they’re part of the organization, and now making sure that they’re fully engaged becomes the challenge. But how do we know if they are working up to their potential? Old-school approaches to performance management, which view a single employee outside of the context of today’s team-based, networked workplace, no longer ring true. Indeed some would argue that many of these approaches were myths to begin with – and I’d have to agree.

Here are five assumptions about measuring employee performance that need to be retired:

Myth #1 – Individuals should be judged solely on their own performance.

The idea that we perform as an island may apply to an isolated few, but it doesn’t fit the majority of workplaces — either today or yesterday. The investment made in working out how to evaluate individuals may be better spent evaluating the quality of their team or business unit’s output. What targets have been hit? What goals have been reached?

Perhaps we should be evaluating employees not only on their performance, but on their level of engagement and on their ability to thrive in team-based environment. Highly engaged employees are more likely to give the kind of discretionary effort that all bosses are looking for, and that have a tangible effect on a company’s bottom line. In fact, Aon Hewitt has reported that for every incremental one-point increase in employee engagement organizations saw a 0.6% increase in sales. For a company with sales of $100 million, this translates to a $6 million windfall! And in companies with the most engaged employees, revenue growth was 2.5 times greater than competitors with lower levels of engagement.

Myth #2 – Good employees just do the job, they don’t need a reason or added meaning.

Is the better employee really the one that doesn’t need to understand how their work aligns with company’s mission and values? Performance stems from engagement. And being engaged stems, in large part, from feeling aligned to — and invested in — the company purpose. Motivation and meaning go hand in hand.

Even if a task is performed well, accomplishing it inside a vacuum is going to create a gap somewhere along the line. Employees deserve to know why they’re there. They’ll participate more fully, and are more likely to push to reach targets and goals if they are invested in the rationale behind the effort.

Myth #3 – An employee that’s good this year will be good next year.

When a team of researchers dove into six years of performance review data from a large U.S. corporation, they found that only a third of high-scoring employees scored as high in subsequent years. And they found no evidence that high-performing employees always perform highly, or that poor performing employees perform poorly. Today’s workforce is continually being met with innovations that require new learning and new skills, so what’s “good” today may not be an accurate measure of what’s desirable tomorrow.

When a company uses trackable learning platforms, they have a means of measuring growth and development. To drive engagement and retention they can extend from onboarding programs, demonstrating a commitment to an employee’s growth from the moment of hire. 84% of employees want to learn, and keep learning. When you align an employee’s learning with the company’s business goals, that’s a win for all.

Myth #4 – Past performance is indicative of future results.

In 2015, a number of Fortune 500 companies announced that they were doing away with old school performance reviews. Accenture, the Gap, Adobe and General Electric all veered away from the annual or quarterly review ritual in favor of building a stronger culture based on continuous feedback and frequent recognition.

What’s happening instead is that many companies are moving to a system where employees and managers can give and receive social feedback and track the history of recognitions given and received. This new approach – measuring the frequency of peer-to-peer, intra-team and team recognitions within a powerful digital and social recognition program – provides better quality insights and has the potential to foster a far more positive, and productive, work culture.

Myth #5 – The best way to measure performance is when no one’s expecting it.

Spot checks, random and unexpected, are still recommended by some HR stalwarts, who assert that it’s a way to motivate employees to give a consistent performance. But it conveys an atmosphere of mistrust that may be more of a de-motivator.

Trust is critical to employee engagement, but it’s still in short supply: a recent survey of nearly 10,000 workers from India to Germany to the U.S. found that only 49% had “a great deal of trust” in those working above and alongside them. Contrast that with study findings showing that organizations are extremely concerned with driving engagement and promoting a workplace culture that is based on transparency and meaningful work. You can’t have both.

That we’re still having this conversation is in part because we may lack the imagination to see our way to a new starting point. But the real drive to perform comes from within.  We are motivated by purpose, and by being appreciated for what we do.

Employees today want to be engaged, we want to know what higher purpose our efforts are contributing to, we want to excel and to grow. Employers should start with that knowledge and measure their employees accordingly.

Make sure to check out the other series of guest blogs from Meghan Biro, starting with her first guest blog post For Recognition To Have An Impact, Make It Strategic.

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About Meghan M. Biro
meghan biroMeghan M. Biro is a globally recognized Talent Management and HR Tech brand strategist, analyst, digital catalyst, author and speaker. As founder and CEO of TalentCulture, she has worked with hundreds of companies, from early-stage ventures to global brands like Microsoft, IBM and Google, helping them recruit and empower stellar talent. Meghan has been a guest on numerous radio shows and online forums, and has been a featured speaker at global conferences. She is a regular contributor at Forbes, Huffington Post, Entrepreneur and several other media outlets. Meghan regularly serves on advisory boards for leading HR and technology brands. Meghan has been voted one of the Top 100 Social Media Power Influencers in 2015 by StatSocial and Forbes, Top 50 Most Valuable Social Media Influencers by General Sentiment, Top 100 on Twitter Business, Leadership, and Tech by Huffington Post, and Top 25 HR Trendsetters by HR Examiner.

 

Inspirational Leadership

5 Keys: How to Become an Inspirational Leader

By: Marci Peters
Director of Customer Service, Achievers

How important is it to have inspirational leadership versus average leadership? The answer: Very important. According to Great Leadership, organizations with the highest quality leaders were 13 times more likely to outperform their competition in key bottom-line metrics such as financial performance, quality of products and services, employee engagement and customer satisfaction. Which is why it should be mission-critical for businesses to focus on developing inspirational leaders to improve company culture, teamwork, performance and bottom-line results.

CEOs are focusing on leadership development opportunities for their workforce more than ever to maximize business performance and encourage their employees to reach their full potential. Gallup estimates that managers account for at least 70 percent of the variance in employee engagement scores across business units. The same study found that managers with high talent are more likely to be engaged than their peers: According to Gallup: “More than half (54%) of managers with high talent are engaged, compared with 39% of managers with functioning talent and 27% of managers with limited talent.” With numbers like these it’s clear to see why it’s so important to foster proper leadership development, so those leaders can in turn inspire their employees, driving engagement and leading to better business outcomes.

So what exactly does it take to become an talented and inspirational leader? There have been countless books written on the subject of leadership, but the secret to being a strong leader is not in a chapter of any book, it is having a passion for leadership. Having the passion for leadership isn’t something you can just learn or pick up over time – it is built within your DNA and motivates you to get up every morning and make an impact. But there are some proven ways to bring out the leader in you.

After more than 20 years in leadership roles, I have identified what I believe are the five keys to unlocking the inspirational leader within:

  1. Find your inspiration
    Identify a role-model. For example, Bill Gates or Richard Branson, to name a couple current examples that instantly leap to mind. But they don’t necessarily have to be famous – think of any successful leader in your life who inspires you daily and aligns with the type of leader you want to be. Start exemplifying their leadership behaviors, whether it’s being more supportive, positive, fair, consistent, transparent, appreciative, or all of the above. It’s important to look up to someone – every leader had another leader to look up to at one point in their life.
  2. Lead by example
    This step sounds cliché, but is absolutely true. You should always lead by example and practice what you preach. No leader is effective or taken seriously if they can’t act on their own beliefs or practices. Leaders need to actually lead the way, versus just talking the talk (and not walking the walk).
  3. Nurture others
    Take care of your people, from hiring to training, support and development and career pathing. Your team needs to feel the love when it comes to the full employee experience. It’s not always just about getting work done – it’s about feeling valued, appreciated and taken care of.
  4. Empower your team
    First and foremost, hire the right people with the right attitude and who are passionate about what they do. You want to build a team that meshes well together and shares the same values as the company, then train them well, starting with a strong, structured onboarding program. And of course, always provide a supportive, empowering environment for your team to thrive. Allow employees to learn from failures and celebrate their successes with frequent recognition and rewards.
  5. Have fun
    It’s as simple as that! Business is business, but you have to make time to play and have fun. It makes all the difference when you enjoy what you do – people can see when someone loves what they do and your positive energy will only benefit the workplace. Also, according to the Center for Creative Leadership, 70 percent of successful executives learn their most important leadership lessons through challenging assignments. Consider taking an out-of-the-box approach with challenging assignments to make them more fun.

Not only do these five keys result in better leadership, but they also have the side benefit of increasing employee engagement. Inspirational leaders take the time to inspire, support, listen and identify opportunities for their team. According to The Harvard Business Review, developing strengths of others can lead to 10-19 percent increase in sales and 14-29 percent increase in profit.

As an inspirational leader, you can effectively engage your employees and develop their strengths for more successful business results. If you act upon these five keys with genuine interest, honesty and sincerity, you will become a more inspirational leader, foster strong and meaningful relationships and improve your bottom-line.

With 51 percent of employees reporting that they are not happy at work (see our latest infographic), companies clearly need more inspirational leaders to boost employee engagement and retain top talent. Want to learn more about the current state of employee disengagement? Download The Greatness Gap: The State of Employee Disengagement White Paper.

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About Marci Peters

Marci Peters

Marci Peters began her 20+ year Customer Experience & Contact Centre profession in the telecom space, but she has spent the last four years with Achievers – Changing the Way the World Works. She believes strongly that customer needs shape the business and employees are your most valuable investment. She has a proven track record in tactical execution of strategic customer initiatives to transform service delivery and drive positive results. View Marci Peters’ LinkedIn profile here.

 

HR Nightmares

10 Scary HR Stats That’ll Make You Howl This Halloween

Skeletons in closets, magic disappearing acts, and people masquerading as someone else: Is Halloween coming or is it just the normal everyday stuff of HR nightmares? This year, avoid spooky business in the office by brushing up on these important HR trends.

#1: Unsuccessful New Hires Haunting Your Halls

A recent survey by Leadership IQ reported that, “46 percent of newly hired employees will fail within 18 months.” Forty-six percent! And it isn’t that you read their resumes wrong or they falsified their background and experience — it’s that those new hires simply are not a good fit for your company. When recruiting, ensure you’re hiring for both fit and skill.

#2 and #3: Dr. Jekyll or Mr. Hyde: Whose Resume Do You Have?

CareerBuilder reports that a whopping 58 percent of hiring managers or recruiters have dealt with resume falsifications, a number that grew during the recent recession. When you add that to SHRM’s HR analysts findings that most resumes are read for five minutes or less, you have a dastardly potion brewing. Spend time getting to know your candidates personally and thoroughly vet their backgrounds to ensure you’re getting the brilliant Dr. Jekyll — not the despicable Mr. Hyde.

#4: The Global Market Beckons, But Your Office May Be a Ghost Town

In 2014, a Deloitte HR analysis found that 48 percent of executives lacked confidence that their human resources department was capable of meeting global workforce demands. What are you doing in the face of globalization? Depending on the location of your employees and offices, you may have a lot of education and retraining to invest in.

#5: On Again, Off Again

Industry statistics and HR data shows that one in three new hires quits within the first six months. Why? Lack of training, failing to fit in, not enough teamwork. Remember that recruiting is only half the battle — ensure your structure is also set up to effectively retain new and old employees alike.

#6: Take Off the Mask: First Impressions Matter

Did you know that one-third of new employees decided within their first week of work whether they’ll be staying with an organization long-term? How do you welcome and onboard new employees? Ensure the first impressions you give are accurate and positive.

#7 and #8: Engaged and Happy Workforce or Disengaged Automatons?

Employee engagement has long been a key issue in workplace success, and recent data and analytics show that hasn’t changed. Nearly two-thirds of all employees are disengaged, and 70 percent are unhappy with their job — and that will show in their work and in your company’s success. You can never overestimate the value of a well-designed engagement strategy.

#9: Pulling a Disappearing Act

Are you ready for as many as two-thirds of your workforce to leave your organization within the next year? That’s how many employees the Kelly Global Workforce Index says will actively engage in a job hunt in a year or less. Again, preventing this requires a strong employee engagement strategy paired with an attractive total rewards package.

#10: The Changing Face of Your Workforce

About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day – and millennials now represent the largest subset of America’s workforce. Are you ready – really ready for the shift your business will undergo as a result? Insight and data show that millennials expect to be compensated differently, engage differently and work differently. It’s time to brush up on your emojis and get down with Snapchat. Don’t be scared, but do prepared!

As we approach the end of the year, take these 10 scary HR stats into consideration when re-strategizing your employee engagement strategy. Don’t be kept in the dark by downloading The Greatness Gap: The State of Employee Disengagement White Paper.

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Also, make sure to check out our cool infographic highlighting these 10 scary HR stats!

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Company Perks

5 Insanely Great Company Perks That Will Draw Top Talent

Life would be simple if hiring the best people were only a matter of offering competitive pay. Incentive Magazine revealed employee benefits are more valuable than ever – according to MetLife’s 10th annual study of employee benefits trends, there is a strong relationship between satisfaction with benefits and overall job satisfaction. In today’s tight talent market, employers have to claim a unique position for their brand if they want to snag the top-tier candidates. Here are five compelling perks your business can use to make all your job openings magnetic.

1. Unlimited vacation

As achievement is increasingly measured by output rather than hours, work schedules are becoming less relevant. Remote working means a revolutionary new approach to accountability; employees may prefer working in the middle of the night or from a seaside cafe on another continent. Workers in the era of unlimited vacation are in some ways more connected to their jobs than ever before while also being free as birds.

2. Endless food

The days of packing lunches from home are ancient history in today’s most progressive organizations. Whether it’s the catered meals and stocked kitchens of SquareSpace, the fun lunches of Warby Parker, or the personalized birthday boxes offered by Stack Exchange, today’s work culture is all about great food. Even smaller companies keep their employees’ energy up by providing healthy high-protein snacks by the coffee maker.

3. On-site health support

Your company’s well-being relies on healthy employees, so why not invest in their health if you have the chance? This philosophy may take the form of on-site medical clinics, fitness centers, or bowling alleys – or it may include offering free gym memberships. Regardless of how fancy the facilities are the goal remains the same. Get employees up and moving around if you want to keep them engaged and energized for the long-term.

4. Unbeatable employee referral programs

Plenty of organizations offer plain vanilla employee referral programs, but if you want to be noticed for your policies, the trick is to pay attention to best practices. Serve up those referral bonuses promptly and be willing to reward outside your own organization. Nudge your staff several times a year to be on the lookout for new team members and change up the bonuses regularly. There’s no better way to build stability in your organization than by maintaining an effective employee referral program.

5. Rewards and recognition

Finally, employee recognition programs both attract employees and keep them engaged, as Ericsson’s E-Star program demonstrates. This company’s monetary and social recognitions program has a broad approach, with numerous benefits and perks, including a referral program, digital gift cards, mobile app capabilities and much more. These recognition all-stars do it all with style, building employee commitment by providing a positive work environment.

Download our Achievers Culture eBook today and learn more about how these perks can fit into your company’s strategy for building and boosting employee engagement.

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Top Talent in Business

12 Tips for Writing the Perfect Job Description

What type of candidates are you trying to recruit for your open job positions — top-notch or just so-so? The way you present your open job positions to the world can make all the difference. As you tackle recruiting and hiring, keep these 12 recruiting tips in mind in order to draft the perfect job description and attract top talent.

1. Begin with the end in mind

Instead of beginning with a list of duties and expectations, start by picturing your ideal candidate and what your standard of success would be for their performance. Develop a profile of your ideal hire, which you can match against applicants.

2. It’s all in the title

Many corporations have streamlined job titles in an effort to match them to certain levels of salary and company hierarchy. If this is the case in your organization, you may consider using a more descriptive external title for recruiting purposes, one that really captures the essence of the job.

3. Write a killer introduction

As Julie Strickland advises in her recruiting tips and advice on Inc.com, you only have a brief amount of time to catch a candidate’s interest. Beginning with an intriguing question, proposition or statement can make your job description really stand out.

4. Short and sweet rules the day

Strickland also wisely counsels that job description crafters should be brief in listing requirements, preferences and expectations. As attention spans grow shorter, this tip is especially relevant. This is also especially relevant as more and more people access candidate information on their mobile devices.

5. Include the hiring manager, recruiter and any other key internal contacts in the writing process

Different people will interact with your new hire in vastly different ways. While the hiring manager is likely most knowledgeable of expected duties and responsibilities, other team members may also have their own expectations to add. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) refers to this step as performing a job analysis.

6. Separate “must-have” from “preferred” skills

Create tiers of desired characteristics, backgrounds and training. While you might prefer that a candidate hit every possible mark on your list, that’s not always realistic. You can still attract a wide variety of applicants who meet your “must have” skills and may also offer a few of your “preferred” characteristics.

7. Keywords, keywords, keywords

Your candidates will likely find your job descriptions while job searching on the web through a number of hiring sites and search engines. Ensure that you’re using relevant keywords so that your job description appears in search results for highly qualified potential candidates.

8. Rank your priorities

Lay out the duties, skills and required background characteristics by ranking from the highest priority to lowest. This can help weed out unqualified candidates who realize that they do not match your most important needs.

9. Flexibility is important

We are in the midst of a rapidly evolving global marketplace. The Small Business Administration (SBA) reminds us that flexibility in a job description, as well as in the recruiting and hiring process, can show candidates that the job holds the potential for growth and future contributions.

10. Don’t forget the details

Is your open position based in the office or remote? Do you offer alternative scheduling? Will travel be expected of the hire? Do they need to have certain licenses or certifications beyond formal degrees? The devil is in the details, and if you miss adding these necessary tidbits, your job searching candidate pool may fall short of your expectations.

11. Should you discuss money?

Whether or not to include a specific salary or salary range has been long debated. Generally, it is more appropriate to give more specific salary ranges for lower level positions while using statements like “salary commensurate with experience” for managerial and senior level positions.

12. End with a proposition

Think of your job description as a sales pitch and use a call to action at the end to fully hook your potential applicants. You want to encourage them to take the next step and apply. And don’t forget to make the next steps of the application process simple so they can act on your call to action quickly and easily.

Don’t let a poorly drafted job description determine the type of talent you bring into your workforce. It’s all about first impressions when it comes to hiring and your job description is the first point of contact with candidates. Take our top 12 tips to start developing the perfect job descriptions for the perfect hires.

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boomerang employees

3 benefits of boomerang employees

“Boomerang” employees are workers who leave an organization and then come back a few months (or even years) later. Depending on their reasons for leaving and what they’ve been doing in the meantime, these returning employees can bring major benefits to your company. Here are three big benefits to re-hiring employees, and a few cautionary notes:

  1. Improved morale

Talented employees are constantly being recruited and headhunted by your competitors, and it can be painful to watch these workers jump ship for a more tempting situation. When they return, it sends the validating message that your organization is actually the best thing going right now. According to Winston Binch, chief digital officer and partner at Deutsch LA, “Our boomerangs prove to us all that we’re on to something, that what we’re doing is noteworthy, and it’s worth sticking around for.”

  1. Cost savings

It requires fewer resources to source, recruit, and onboard a former employee than someone who’s entirely unfamiliar with your company. You may not even need to use a recruiter, and a boomerang employee can save you time and money by being ready to hit the ground running.

  1. Fresh skills and energy

If your employee left their position with your company in order to pursue a passion, gain new skills, or try their hand at building a startup, they will have grown and changed during their absence. When they return, they are likely to bring fresh talent, knowledge, and networking contacts to your company.

Warning signs

While hiring boomerang employees is usually a net plus, it’s important to be aware of potential pitfalls in this practice. If an employee left due to personality conflicts, and the problems stopped as soon as they were gone, it’s not worth taking a chance on reintroducing a source of disruption. Likewise, if the employee was not performing exceptionally well at the time of departure, they need to have a clear explanation regarding what factors interfered with their previous performance, and why things are different this time.

As companies recognize the benefits that boomerang employees bring with them, these returning workers are being welcomed back in far greater numbers than they once were. Seventy-six percent of HR professionals note that they have become more open to re-hiring previous employees than they used to be, while 56 percent say they now give high priority to former employees who left in good standing, according to a Kronos survey. Judicious rehiring of good workers is increasingly recognized as a way to bring fresh energy and value to your organization.

recruiting great recruiters

5 tips for recruiting great recruiters

Recruiters are key business personnel, because the quality of your entire organization depends on their ability to find and attract the best possible candidates. Competition for top recruiters is intense, but here are five tips on how to find a recruiter that will put you ahead of your competition:

Use an executive recruiting organization

If your company is large enough to need a specialized recruiter, it’s large enough to consider the option of hiring an outside recruiting organization. Investing in third-party expertise can have far-reaching benefits for the future of your company, since a top-notch HR hire will then go on to fill your ranks with equally excellent employees. If you decide to take this option, look for an executive search consultant or team that specifically outlines their background in sourcing HR talent.

Screen for key characteristics

When you publicize your company’s need for a new recruiter, you’ll encounter an assortment of candidate profiles. If you keep in mind the primary qualities of your ideal recruiter, you can build your selection process to screen for those specific qualities. According to Concordia University, the primary characteristics that you should look for in a recruiter are: organizational ability, ethics, communication skills, problem-solving acumen, leadership talent, and experience in the field.

Post the job in HR trade publications

To find professionals in any field, you go to the specialized online forums where they network with each other. Human resources professionals are consummate networkers, and a focused HR job board on their favorite trade publication is likely to be the first place they’ll look for new opportunities. Two examples are HR Jobs at the Society for Human Resource Management and the Career Center at Workforce HR Jobs.

Take a team approach to hiring

Whether you’re adding to an already-existing HR department or hiring your first dedicated recruiter, the decision is too important to rest solely on one person’s opinion. It’s a good idea to interview potential HR candidates at least twice, and invite other managers to sit in on at least one of the interviews.

Present an updated view of HR’s function

The function of the recruiter within a company is currently undergoing a radical shift. In order to attract the top HR talent, you have to demonstrate your understanding of the new role that human resources leaders play in today’s organizations. Recruiting and hiring is no longer merely an administrative role; instead, HR professionals are key members in the company’s management team, helping build core strategy for the future.

Finding and attracting good recruiters requires a significant investment of resources, but this investment is one that will return abundant benefits in social and financial realms.

Employer branding

How to attract job candidates with excellent employer branding

The availability of skilled workers was named as a significant concern by 73 percent of CEOs, according to a recent PWC survey. In today’s competitive hiring ecosystem, high-quality “employer branding” is key to attracting top talent. Because millennial workers don’t build lifetime careers at a single company the way their parents did, they are always checking to see if the grass is greener over at the next corporate campus. To attract and hold the best of this skilled group, you must make sure that your employer branding is competitive. Here’s some context for you to work from:

What exactly is employer branding?

Your employer brand is your reputation as an employer. This is separate from the reputation of your products, although the two can overlap. If you’re known as a stellar employer, some customers will feel motivated to buy your products just for the sake of supporting your good policies. Harvard Business Review points out that employer branding in the age of social media has become far more transparent and far more potent, because employees will share impressions with their entire social networks.

How does your employer brand affect recruiting?

Today’s top workers can pick and choose among opportunities, and company marketing departments find themselves pressed into service to make the company appeal to prospective job applicants as well as to customers. Long-term recruitment needs are the primary drivers behind employer branding, according to CEOs and HR directors surveyed about hiring strategies. 61 percent of these executives have created an “employee value proposition,” listing all the benefits that their company offers to employees. The fact is that if you’re competing for limited talent resources, good employer branding is a necessity. Furthermore, once you’ve snagged a few excellent hires, they’re likely to sing your company’s praises and attract other high-level workers to apply in the future.

Conversely, there is no way to simply skip the task of employer branding. In today’s connected world, every company has a reputation that is abundantly shared and discussed. If you don’t pay attention to creating a positive employer brand, your omission may result in your having a negative one.

Tips for enhancing your employer brand

Here are a few guidelines for establishing an enticing reputation that will generate more high-quality job applicants:

  • Identify external and internal perceptions of your company: The first step to improving your employer branding is to discover the problem areas. Make an effort to learn how your company is viewed by reading ratings on Glassdoor and other hiring forums, and also ask for anonymous employee input.
  • Tell your company’s story: People naturally gravitate toward stories, and potential employees are looking for roles in an appealing narrative.
  • Engage the CEO and senior managers: Top talent is attracted to organizations that have a clear mission statement and philosophy. A round table discussion with company leaders is helpful for setting the tone of the company culture.
  • Draft brand ambassadors: Your current employees are your best channel for attracting good job applicants. Their advocacy (via social media or in person) will be trusted by potential hires far more than any official company communications.
  • Hire a branding expert: Even if you have an in-house marketing department, you can benefit from the expertise of an independent employer branding consultant. This person is well aware of how to give you a competitive edge.

Building a stellar employer brand is more reliant on focused attention than on major investment. Each business has a unique story and some one-of-a-kind characteristics; you simply need to clarify these unique qualities and broadcast them effectively.

How to Recruit Employees

In-house or outsource: choosing the right recruiting method for the job

The average time to fill an open position is now close to a month. During that time, the costs of the unfilled position mount up. Being shorthanded can damage the morale of the remaining employees, require paying overtime to complete projects, or prevent the company from meeting deadlines or taking on new work. Companies need to use the most effective methods possible to bring in a replacement worker quickly in order to minimize the time, effort, and expenses associated with the recruiting process and the unfilled position. When you’re thinking about how to recruit employees, you should weigh the pros and of conducting your own candidate search using internal recruiters on your human resources staff or hiring a specialty head-hunting firm. Here’s a look at when you should do it in-house and when you should hand off the effort to a specialist.

Keep recruiting in-house
If you already have a recruiter on your HR staff, you should start the employee search process by working with them. If you’ve filled other positions recently, you probably have a pool of resumes from candidates who weren’t right for those positions but might be ideal for this new opportunity. Reaching out to contacts you already have can save you time in identifying your new hire. Your in-house staff will also be able to identify any current employees who may be looking for a transfer or are ready to step up and assume new responsibility. Using an internal transfer to fill a position shortcuts the onboarding process significantly, and often improves morale for employees who see that career growth is possible.

Outsource recruiting to a specialist
If you’re hiring for a very specialized skill or for a very senior-level position, a headhunter who specializes in that field or in executive recruitment is likely to have more connections and a deeper network of potential candidates than you could contact on your own. Working with an external recruiter is also effective if your own staff is overloaded with other responsibilities. The external team can do the preliminary screening and involve you only when an applicant is a solid potential match. If you’ve been conducting your own search and not finding candidates you like, that’s another time to reach out for assistance and work with a recruiting firm who knows how to recruit employees that are a better fit for your business.

Of course, if you don’t have a recruiter on your HR team, you’ll turn to a recruiting firm to fill open positions. If you plan to do a lot of hiring, you might even consider opening a position for a recruiter as well.