current and emerging HR Trends

Top HR Trends for 2016 with an Eye to the Future

By: Josh Danson and Iain Ferreira

With the sands of 2016 close to completing their journey through the pinched middle of the proverbial hourglass, it is only natural to consider what 2017 has in store. But before the future becomes the present, learning what trends emerged in the HR space in 2016 might help inform, and better prepare us for what’s to come. Below are 5 HR trends that emerged in 2016 that we believe will become more ingrained and ubiquitous in the coming months and years:

1. A More Diverse and Employee-Centric Workplace

The idea of an employee-centric workplace is one that can impact almost every aspect of an organization. From providing mechanisms for employees to directly influence the direction of a company, to facilitating a culture of recognition and engagement, in 2016 businesses were more focused on those in “the trenches” than ever before. For many organizations, the rise of an employee-centric work environment was made evident through the simple act of letting employees express their true selves, rather than stifling the individuality and diversity of thought that each individual brings to the table. As Kety Duron (Chief Human Resources and Diversity Officer at City of Hope, a California-based healthcare system) states in a recently published article on Forbes.com,  “Differences question the status quo and force us to learn from diverse thinking. You have to have people who are agile and can adapt. We can’t say we are open and then create workplaces that do not embrace diversity of thought. If we are trying to select and attract diverse talent to the leadership table and embrace their values, we must continue to encourage and value diverse thinking. When that happens at the leadership level it will cascade to all levels, creating an organization where diversity and inclusion is part of the organizational fabric.”

2. Work Anywhere, Anytime

With the ubiquity of personal electronic devices and growing variety of ways to log on and stay virtually connected, it is easier than ever for employees to work in the places in which they are most comfortable.  According to Jeanne Meister’s article, “Consumerization of HR: 10 Trends Companies Will Follow in 2016,” workplace flexibility is second only to salary when prospective employees are evaluating a job opportunity. Workplace flexibility not only creates an environment of trust between employer and employee, but also fosters a better work/life balance while reducing the costs of commuting. When work is results-driven, it shouldn’t matter where the work is being performed as long as mutually agreed-upon goals and objectives are met.

3. It’s (Still!) All About Employee Engagement

Employee engagement is the measure of how much employees believe in their company, and how much effort they are willing to put in to work toward its success. According to Gallup, in 2016 only 1/3 of U.S. employees reported being engaged at work and this number is little-changed in over a decade. So it’s not surprising that there are a number of solutions on the market focused on improving employee engagement. The most exciting and promising of these are focused on offering a complete employee engagement solution, not only focused on Health & Wellness, Learning & Development, or Rewards & Recognition, but linking all of those, while tying in measurement tools such as pulse surveys along with a robust suite of people analytics. By focusing on the complete employee experience, these emerging tools will provide the greatest ROI for emerging, employee-centric organizations.

4. Frequent, Real-Time Evaluation Tools

With increased emphasis on engagement and greater access to employee generated data and insights through recognition and rewards platforms, 2017 is shaping up to be the “Year of the Employee”. This being the case, it makes sense to invest in tools that can help you measure and act on employee engagement data in a frequent, timely manner. These can be as simple as a daily or weekly pulse survey offered through a centralized platform, or as formal as weekly one-on-one meetings between employees and their managers. By analyzing the results from these evaluation tools, companies can address certain systemic failings almost immediately This trend further emphasizes the transition to the “employee-centric” model by allowing employees to anonymously (in the case of online surveys) express their true feelings regarding their work environment and company priorities on a regular basis and then making that data widely available to help guide the business. Not only was this a trend in 2016, some think this will be a major enterprise in 2017 and beyond.

5. Employees as Cultural Ambassadors

In today’s always-on, mobile, social, transparent environment, rare is the employee lacking an up-to-date LinkedIn page and a Glassdoor premium membership. Couple these trends with greater emphasis on the individual and you have a recipe for what could be a company’s greatest (and perhaps, worst) asset for attracting top talent. With a simple click, employees can share with the hundreds, if not thousands of people in their social networks, the photos of that amazing team-building trip or a well-written blog post published by a company, espousing emergent industry trends in a given business sector. These seemingly disparate instances of social sharing actually form a lattice of social relevancy that serves to inform prospective employees of the pros (and cons) of an organization. A highly engaged, well-compensated employee is a greater recruiting tool than any other used before, as they are not a faceless, monolithic, one-way source of knowledge, but rather an approachable source of “real” insight that candidates can engage with to get an honest look into the inner working of a given organization.

Almost all of the emergent trends of 2016 reinforced the idea that employees are imbued with more power than ever before. From increased and ongoing importance of employee engagement, to trusting employees to get the job done from wherever they please, companies have already taken strong measures to assure they are at the forefront of this transition of power. With historically low unemployment rates, increased transparency, and more democratizing resources such as job boards, employer review sites and career building sites such as LinkedIn, 2017 looks sure to be the Year of the Employee.

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About Josh Danson

Josh Danson

Josh is Director of Content Marketing at Achievers. An accomplished marketing and communications professional with more than 20 years’ experience in the fields of marketing and PR, Josh worked as a press secretary on Capitol Hill before moving West, and from politics into PR – and on into content marketing. Josh graduated with High Honors in History from Kenyon College and lives in San Francisco with his wife and 9 year-old daughter. In addition to work and family, he is passionate about music, politics and fly fishing (not necessarily in that order).

About Iain Ferreira

Iain Ferreira

Iain Ferreira is the Content Marketing Manager at Achievers. He lives in San Francisco. You can view his Linkedin profile here.

 

 

Employee Recognition HR Stats

5 Eye-Opening HR Stats: Why Employee Recognition Matters

By: Sarah Clayton
Communications and Campaigns Specialist, Achievers

Employees are arguably the most important component of a successful business.  Employees put a human face on the product, build relationships with customers, and define the work culture that feeds business performance – yet 32% of companies struggle to retain top talent. What defines an effective retention strategy varies from business to business, but there is one common element that has been found to work across most business types and sectors: employee recognition. In fact, a recent Achievers’ study found that employees have a deep desire for recognition, with 93% hoping to be recognized at least once a quarter. In addition, 75% of employees who received at least monthly recognition (even if informal) reported being satisfied with their jobs. And finally, in a recent Harvard Business Review study, 72% of respondents ranked recognition given for high performers as having a significant impact on employee engagement. With these kinds of numbers, it is clear that both employees and employers stand to benefit from a well-executed employee recognition program.

As we approach the end of 2016, this is the perfect opportunity to define the tone for the New Year and reflect on the importance of employee recognition for businesses. To help set the groundwork for a successful 2017, we present to you five revealing HR stats that prove the value of employee recognition.

  1. Employees are loyal to careers, not jobs 

    Workplace loyalty is not derived from a job; it is nurtured through a fulfilling career.  78% of employees would stay with their current employer if they knew they had a career path instead of just a job. With employee recognition, you can motivate and identify core competencies to help develop career paths for employees in a positive and organic way.

  1. Understanding progress matters 

    Goals can be daunting: understanding the progress made towards attaining them makes them seem more manageable, and 32% of employees agree. Employee recognition isn’t just for the big wins; it’s an excellent way to support progress and provide encouragement by giving employees feedback every time they move one step closer to completing their goals.

  1. Respect knowledge and experience 

    People work hard to cultivate their skills, and 53% of employees say respect for their knowledge and experience is their top expectation of leadership. An employee recognition platform allows both leaders and peers to publicly praise employees for their expertise, providing the employee with further motivation to develop it further.

  1. Recognized employees are happy employees 

    Employee recognition doesn’t require a huge commitment. In a recent survey of 1,000 U.S.-based, full-time employees 75% of employees who were recognized by their manager once a month – which is a good cadence to check in on progress to long-term goals – reported being satisfied with their job. While 85% of those that were recognized weekly reported being satisfied. The more satisfied your employee is, the more engaged they will be, and the more likely they will stay with your company for the long-term while producing stronger results.

  1. A mission statement is meant to guide employees 

    Unnervingly, nearly two-thirds (61%) of employees don’t know what their company mission statement is. An employee recognition program, clearly linked to a company’s mission and values, is a great way to align employees around those values. By praising and reinforcing behaviors and outcomes that line up with and support the company’s mission and values, employees are inspired to live and breathe those values every day. This in turn helps to build a unified corporate culture and makes clear to individuals how their work helps the company to achieve its goals.

Retaining employees is about establishing reciprocal loyalty, making their jobs feel meaningful, and supporting and encouraging their professional development – one of the best ways to do all of these things is through employee recognition. When a company demonstrates its commitment to supporting and recognizing its employees, they will be rewarded with engaged employees who are dedicated to contributing to the company’s mission and bottom-line.

To discover more eye-opening HR stats and learn more about the correlation between recognition and retention, check out our white paper: The Greatness Gap: The State of Employee Disengagement.

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About Sarah Clayton

Sarah ClaytonSarah Clayton is the Communications and Campaigns Specialist at Achievers, where she focuses on generating content to drive desired recognition behaviors and engagement on the platform.

 

 

HR Nightmares

10 Scary HR Stats That’ll Make You Howl This Halloween

Skeletons in closets, magic disappearing acts, and people masquerading as someone else: Is Halloween coming or is it just the normal everyday stuff of HR nightmares? This year, avoid spooky business in the office by brushing up on these important HR trends.

#1: Unsuccessful New Hires Haunting Your Halls

A recent survey by Leadership IQ reported that, “46 percent of newly hired employees will fail within 18 months.” Forty-six percent! And it isn’t that you read their resumes wrong or they falsified their background and experience — it’s that those new hires simply are not a good fit for your company. When recruiting, ensure you’re hiring for both fit and skill.

#2 and #3: Dr. Jekyll or Mr. Hyde: Whose Resume Do You Have?

CareerBuilder reports that a whopping 58 percent of hiring managers or recruiters have dealt with resume falsifications, a number that grew during the recent recession. When you add that to SHRM’s HR analysts findings that most resumes are read for five minutes or less, you have a dastardly potion brewing. Spend time getting to know your candidates personally and thoroughly vet their backgrounds to ensure you’re getting the brilliant Dr. Jekyll — not the despicable Mr. Hyde.

#4: The Global Market Beckons, But Your Office May Be a Ghost Town

In 2014, a Deloitte HR analysis found that 48 percent of executives lacked confidence that their human resources department was capable of meeting global workforce demands. What are you doing in the face of globalization? Depending on the location of your employees and offices, you may have a lot of education and retraining to invest in.

#5: On Again, Off Again

Industry statistics and HR data shows that one in three new hires quits within the first six months. Why? Lack of training, failing to fit in, not enough teamwork. Remember that recruiting is only half the battle — ensure your structure is also set up to effectively retain new and old employees alike.

#6: Take Off the Mask: First Impressions Matter

Did you know that one-third of new employees decided within their first week of work whether they’ll be staying with an organization long-term? How do you welcome and onboard new employees? Ensure the first impressions you give are accurate and positive.

#7 and #8: Engaged and Happy Workforce or Disengaged Automatons?

Employee engagement has long been a key issue in workplace success, and recent data and analytics show that hasn’t changed. Nearly two-thirds of all employees are disengaged, and 70 percent are unhappy with their job — and that will show in their work and in your company’s success. You can never overestimate the value of a well-designed engagement strategy.

#9: Pulling a Disappearing Act

Are you ready for as many as two-thirds of your workforce to leave your organization within the next year? That’s how many employees the Kelly Global Workforce Index says will actively engage in a job hunt in a year or less. Again, preventing this requires a strong employee engagement strategy paired with an attractive total rewards package.

#10: The Changing Face of Your Workforce

About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day – and millennials now represent the largest subset of America’s workforce. Are you ready – really ready for the shift your business will undergo as a result? Insight and data show that millennials expect to be compensated differently, engage differently and work differently. It’s time to brush up on your emojis and get down with Snapchat. Don’t be scared, but do prepared!

As we approach the end of the year, take these 10 scary HR stats into consideration when re-strategizing your employee engagement strategy. Don’t be kept in the dark by downloading The Greatness Gap: The State of Employee Disengagement White Paper.

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Also, make sure to check out our cool infographic highlighting these 10 scary HR stats!

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Executive Buy-In

How to Get Executives On Board with Employee Rewards and Recognition Programs

By: Kellie Wong
Social Media and Blog Manager, Achievers

Dr. Donald Clifton’s book How Full Is Your Bucket revealed the number one reason people leave their jobs is because they don’t feel appreciated. But there’s a proven way to address this problem: focus on employee engagement. According to a Harvard Business Review study, 71% of respondents rank employee engagement as very important to achieving overall organizational success and recognition happens to be the #1 driver of employee engagement.

It’s clear businesses need to focus more on employee engagement and recognition strategies. Not only does engaging and recognizing employees make them feel valued, but they are more productive in return. By focusing on employee engagement and happiness, your bottom line results will improve as a result. In fact, the Harvard Business Review recently shared that developing employees’ strengths can increase sales up to 19% and profits up to 29%. And if you’re still skeptical, just listen to our customers. Taken together, it’s pretty clear that both employees and employers stand to benefit when they have the right rewards and recognition programs in place

If this is the case, why do some businesses find it hard to get a successful rewards and recognition program off the ground? It’s not due to a lack of desire from employees, or support from their managers. According to our latest infographic on the state of employee disengagement, 93% of employees hope to be recognized at least quarterly, while WorldatWork reported that 46% of senior managers view recognition programs as an investment rather than an expense. So where is the roadblock? Oftentimes, we’ve found, it comes down to a lack of executive buy-in and support. Gaining executive buy-in is one of the most critical factors for initiating and maintaining a successful employee rewards and recognition program; it is also one of the toughest hurdles for HR to overcome.

With this in mind, we’ve compiled some tips and strategies to help HR professionals get executives on board with employee rewards and recognition programs.

Get their attention with numbers

Numbers don’t lie, so why not show your executives some numbers that’ll be sure to grab their attention. According to the Hay Group, a global consulting firm, “Our research into employee engagement has shown that companies with the most engaged employees report revenue growth at a rate 2.5X greater than their competitors with the lowest level of engagement.” Still not convinced? How about some powerful numbers provided by best-selling author and leading authority on employee recognition, Dr. Bob Nelson. Nelson shares that organizations which have a ‘culture of recognition’ have employees that are:

  • 5X times more likely to feel valued
  • 7X more likely to stay with their company
  • 6X more likely to invest in their company
  • 11X more likely to feel completely committed to their jobs

And if you’re targeting the C-suite, make sure to share this little tidbit: The financial return of Fortune’s Best Places to Work has been shown to be 233% higher over a 6-year period as compared with overall market returns and companies with higher employee satisfaction scores have been shown to have a 700% higher shareholder return.

Win them over with the right program

But getting executive buy-in for your rewards and recognition program isn’t just about convincing them of the potential ROI or how it will lead to bottom line growth. At it’s core, it should be about taking care of your most valuable asset — your employees. With that in mind, you also need to sell them on your vision of an employee rewards and recognition program that reflects your company’s culture and values and keeps employees needs at the forefront. What makes it unique? Why will your employees love it? How is this particular program the perfect fit for your business?

To help guide your pitch, start with the following key points:

  • Reinforces core values. Inc. recently shared why defining company values is important, stating, “Promoting your values throughout your organization can help your employees focus on their goals.” With the right employee rewards and recognition program you can easily tie in your company values with every recognition, reinforcing core values across the organization daily. With such strong reinforcement your employees can better focus on goals and, in turn, be more productive.
  • Results-driven. Recognitions can be tied to specific business objectives, such as rewarding employees for hitting a certain sales target, as well as to broader objectives like a focus on customer satisfaction. Employee recognition is particularly powerful because it can infuse each and every action and interaction in your company with inspiration. Points-based employee recognition underscores the value employees are creating when they contribute to success and do the right things.
  • Data and analytics. Key metrics can be accessed for real-time analytics and reporting. A good recognition and rewards program can give you the ability to track every recognition and reward given or received, allowing you to identify top performers and empowering managers to take action accordingly.
  • Cost-savings. It’s a no-brainer — online, social recognition solutions require less time, effort and cost when compared to trying to create a do-it-yourself solution or continuing to invest in outdated years of service programs.

A critical factor for any business and executive is to draw in and keep top talent. The best way to do so is by focusing on employee engagement and how to make employees happy through the right rewards and recognition program. Remember, companies with the most engaged employees report revenue growth at a rate 2.5X greater than their competitors with the lowest level of engagement. Employee engagement can quickly become top of mind for any executive once they understand how much it directly impacts business revenue.

To learn more, download the Obtaining Executive Buy-In for Employee Rewards and Recognition Programs White Paper.

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About Kellie Wong
Kellie WongKellie Wong is the Social Media and Blog Manager for Achievers. She manages Achievers’ social media presence and
The Engage Blog, including the editorial calendars for both. In addition to writing blog content for The Engage Blog, she also manages and maintains relationships with 20+ guest blog contributors and edits every piece of content that gets published. Connect with Kellie on LinkedIn.

 

The State of Employee Engagement

The Current State of Employee Engagement and How to Make It Better

By: Kellie Wong
Social Media and Blog Manager, Achievers

How happy and engaged are our employees? It’s an important question that every business should want to know the answer to. We hate to break it to you, but according to our latest employee survey, 51% of employees are not happy at work. What does that mean for your business? The less happy and engaged your employees are, the less productive your business will be as a whole. Start focusing on how to make your employees more engaged for better business outcomes. Take at a look at the current state of employee engagement and see what you can do to make it better.

Focus on your mission and vision
Greatness Infographic Mission and Vision

It’s surprising that a whopping 61% of employees don’t know their company’s mission. A mission and vision statement is essentially a summary of the aims, values and direction of your company. Knowing and embracing the company’s mission helps provide employees with a sense of purpose and with motivation to succeed. But if your employees aren’t aligned to, or even aware of, your company’s mission and vision, how can you expect them to move forward as a whole towards the same goals? Focus on your company’s mission and vision, and start strategizing on how to build more awareness of those core, guiding principles within your organization.

Emphasize shared cultural values
Greatness Infographic Culture

Not only are a majority of employees unaware of their company’s mission and vision, but apparently they are also oblivious to their company’s cultural values. Values are important because they help define company culture and reflect what an organization ultimately cares about. You want your employees to embrace your company’s values because by having a personal and emotional connection to what they do, they gain a sense of importance and motivation behind their work. But as our research shows, shared culture can only go so far towards improving overall levels of engagement.

Encourage leadership to nurture trust
Greatness Infographic Leadership Statistic

We’ve all heard the saying, “People join companies, but leave bad managers.” One constant that remains as a contributing factor to employee disengagement is poor leadership. Only 45% of employees trust their company’s leadership and half don’t expect to be in their current job just one year from now. This represents an obvious disconnect between employees and their work, and especially between employees and leadership. According to a Careerbuilder.com study cited in a Wharton management blog, 76% of full-time workers, while not actively looking for a new job, would leave their current workplace if the right opportunity came along. Don’t lose great talent because of a lack of trust in leadership and in their vision for the future. Reassure your employees that your company and leadership team cares about them, as both workers and human beings. Put the emphasis on showing them respect and trust in what they do.

Reward and recognize employees
Greatness Infographic Rewards and Recognition

Results clearly show that employees have a deep desire for employee recognition. A massive 93% hope to be recognized at least quarterly, if not more. Why is it important to recognize employees for their hard work? According to the Psychologically Healthy Workplace Program, employees who feel valued by their employer are 60% more likely to be motivated to do their very best at work. A quick recognition, whether from management or a peer, goes a long way and can boost employee engagement by up to 22%. Start recognizing and rewarding your employees for jobs well done and witness the positive impact it makes. Today’s rewards and recognition programs go way beyond tired old plaques and paperweights and should be based on a social media model to encourage the highest levels of adoption and active use. They should link to employees’ existing social networks and other common communications platforms like Slack and Jabber, offer point-based rewards so employees can choose items that are meaningful to them, and most importantly, they should serve to reinforce company values and encourage desired business results.

To learn more, download The Greatness Gap: The State of Employee Disengagement.

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About Kellie Wong
Kellie WongKellie Wong is the Social Media and Blog Manager for Achievers. She manages Achievers’ social media presence and
The Engage Blog, including the editorial calendars for both. In addition to writing blog content for The Engage Blog, she also manages and maintains relationships with 20+ guest blog contributors and edits every piece of content that gets published. Connect with Kellie on LinkedIn.

 

HR skills

3 HR skills you need to be successful

The business landscape is evolving rapidly, and HR skills that were once highly prized are becoming obsolete. HR professionals no longer spend their time keeping records, and new technology has transformed how employees engage with their work. The best HR leaders have traded in paper pushing and business-as-usual management methods and have instead become strategic business partners, actively contributing to company growth. In order to keep their seat at the table, HR professionals have had to take advantage of the rich employee data that’s at their disposal. They’re having to become experts in data analysis and a wide variety of HR information systems so that they can improve employee success, forecast changes in human capital, and make informed recommendations for policy and process changes. If you want to be an incredible HR leader, these are the skills you’ll need to adopt moving forward:

Tech-savvy vs. traditional methods

The days of an exclusively on-site workforce are a thing of the past. Mobile technology and changing workforce demographics have transformed where and how employees work. Some research predicts that 70% of mobile professionals will conduct their work on personal smart devices by 2018, and HR leaders are embracing this change. Instead of insisting on traditional methods for getting the job done – eight hours in the office in front of a computer – forward-thinking HR professionals are getting comfortable with new technology and incorporating it into business processes.

Strategic partner vs. record keeper

In the early days of the HR function, primary responsibilities included processing basic transactions. Changes in employee status, modifications to benefits, and corrections to personal information were all handled by hand. New technology has made it possible for staff members and their managers to handle these adjustments independently, which mean HR professionals can explore new ways to add value.

The best HR leaders concentrate their efforts on strategic partnership, using evidence gathered through data analysis to provide strategic recommendations to the business. Incredible HR leaders design proactive initiatives to make the workforce stronger, rather than simply reacting to events that have already occurred in the workplace. These efforts are being recognized by executive leadership. In fact, a KPMG study found that 85 percent of business leaders agree: HR plays a strong role in meeting strategic goals.

Analytical vs. business as usual

Of course, adding value through strategic partnership only works when HR leaders develop their skills in data analysis. As new technology permits the gathering of detailed business and employee performance, smart HR professionals are spending their time looking for connections that will strengthen the business. Research has determined that 62 percent of organizations are already using advanced analytics to find people/profit connections, and 70 percent of survey participants plan to expand their use of data analysis tools over the next three years.

Today’s truly exceptional HR leaders are prepared to act as tech-savvy strategic partners, with a focus on developing outstanding data analysis skills. The transformation of HR promises opportunities for employee success in every HR specialty.

Talent Management Strategy

3 biggest talent management challenges for 2016

The workforce is changing rapidly, and many companies are struggling to update their talent management process to keep pace with new workplace cultures. Companies that can’t keep up with the expectations of today’s employees will see a decline in engagement — and a corresponding decrease in their bottom line.

A 2015 report by the Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM) gives a look into current levels of staff engagement. According to the report, only 39 percent of respondents are “very satisfied” with their job, indicating that there is a lot of work ahead for managers in the upcoming year.

  1. Creating a culture of engagement

Almost three-quarters of respondents to the SHRM survey listed “respectful treatment of all employees at all levels” as the No. 1 driver of engagement. Employees also considered “trust between employees and senior management” to be a critically important engagement factor (64 percent), along with “management’s recognition of employee job performance” (55 percent).

In 2016, successful companies will focus on a talent management strategy that takes these new priorities into consideration. Creating a culture of engagement to increase retention will be management’s primary challenge.

  1. Adjusting the frequency of feedback

Employees have indicated that they are dissatisfied with the traditional yearly review process. Instead, they are interested in real-time feedback, both positive and negative, that is delivered at least once a month.

In our North American Workforce survey, we found that 60 percent of employees reported that they don’t receive any on-the-spot feedback, and 53 percent stated that they don’t feel recognized for their achievements at all. It’s no surprise then that a full 41 percent indicated that they’re unhappy with the frequency of the feedback and recognition they do receive.

These numbers tell us that in 2016, management will be challenged to place greater emphasis on providing employees with frequent, high-quality feedback in an effort to increase levels of engagement.

  1. Attracting top talent

The job market has shifted dramatically over the past five years, going from employer-centric to almost entirely candidate-centric. Attracting top talent will be a significant challenge in 2016, as companies struggle to retain current employees, as well as fill any vacancies quickly.

Forward-thinking organizations are preparing for an applicant desert now by building their talent brand. This approach — ensuring that the company has a reputation in the marketplace as an employer of choice — relies primarily on a comprehensive talent management process that translates well to word-of-mouth referrals, company profiles and employee reviews on job boards.

As the employment market changes, organizations must adjust talent management strategies to meet and exceed employee expectations. Those that fall short find themselves with a disengaged workforce, which quickly cripples their ability to remain competitive.

HR Trends for 2016

Top 3 HR trends for 2016

In 2016, look for organizations to tighten their focus on people management, from building an inclusive company culture to increasing employee engagement. HR trends to watch for 2016 include these three hot topics:

1. Increased use of data analysis

Analyzing data to gather consumer information has been a staple of marketing strategy for decades, but data analytics is only now starting to catch on for HR professionals. One study indicates that the use of big data for people management is gathering momentum, with the current industry average at 42 percent. Smart HR professionals will be honing their data analysis skills so they can make meaningful contributions to strategic conversations in 2016.

2. Revamped performance management processes

Research shows that traditional performance management processes are falling by the wayside. A 2014 Deloitte study determined that only 8 percent of HR professionals considered their performance management process to be a key driver in adding value to business operations. However, that number jumped to 75 percent in the 2015 survey. In fact, 89 percent of respondents stated that they plan to change their performance evaluation process in the next 18 months.

This overhaul is overdue. In our 2015 North American Workforce survey, we discovered that 60 percent of respondents don’t receive on-the-spot feedback. The traditional annual and semi-annual reviews do little to remedy systemic issues with timely feedback and performance management, and fortunately many HR professionals are beginning to agree.

3. Updated employee development

The final HR trend for 2016 is a shift in the approach to employee training and development. Gone are the days in which staff can expect only enough training to perform their job functions. Today’s workers want continuous improvement of their skills in order to prepare for promotions or pursue passion projects.

In a study by the Society for Human Resource Management, 42 percent of workers considered their employer’s commitment to professional development to be very important to their engagement, but 46 percent were dissatisfied with their employer’s commitment to building skills. Business leaders are becoming aware of the changing emphasis on development, as the issue moved from the eighth most critical challenge for employers in Deloitte’s 2014 survey to the third most critical challenge in the 2015 report.

With the job market transitioning from employer-driven to candidate-driven, retaining top talent stands to be a challenge in 2016. Increased employee engagement is critical to staying competitive, and forward-thinking managers will ensure that they lead the way when it comes to increased data analysis, improved performance management processes, and enhanced employee development.

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Achievers selected in Gartner’s employee recognition and rewards software guide

Gartner recently completed their “Technology Overview for Employee Recognition and Rewards Software,” a comprehensive look at the evolution of R&R technologies over the past five years. They investigated a variety of solutions, including the Achievers Employee Success Platform, to determine what features and functionality consumers can expect, the common use cases for employee recognition platforms, and what criteria HR and IT professionals should use to select a solution.

You can access their full findings and recommendations on our website.

Gartner Report Achievers

 

[Webinar] Engage your multi-generational workforce and inspire a new wave of business success

Gartner_logoWorkforces at top-tier companies are becoming younger, more social, and less employer-loyal by the day. For these organizations, achieving business goals is about more than just employee tenure and traditional Years-of-Service awards. In order to succeed in today’s competitive talent market, best-in-class organizations are utilizing technologies that recognize their employees’ valuable contributions, encourage them to work harder and smarter, and best of all, make them happier at work.

Research shows that multifaceted employee rewards and recognition programs help organizations reach their business goals by better aligning their employees with company culture and motivating them by celebrating their individual success. It makes sense, right? Driving better business results and inspiring successful employees has everything to do with employee engagement. Rewarding employees just for showing up isn’t enough anymore. Read more →