How to motivate employees during the holidays

How to motivate employees during the holiday season

The winter holiday season is often a distracting time for employees. They may be hosting family members or planning to travel, the kids are home from school, and they may be working under generalized holiday stress. The common outcome for business is a high absentee rate and a distracted work force, leading directly to lowered productivity. As a manager, it’s your job to find positive ways to keep everyone on task. Below are three basic tips to keep your employees enthusiastic about their jobs despite the pressures of the season.

Plan ahead and be flexible

Don’t let holiday scheduling sneak up on you. Meet with your staff right now to go over everyone’s scheduling needs and to make sure the office doesn’t end up shorthanded. Nothing adds to holiday burnout more quickly than employees being forced to do someone else’s work in addition to their own. If your staff can work remotely, consider letting them extend their time away while still meeting productivity goals. Also remember that winter holiday travel can be affected by weather, and half your team could end up snowed in at an airport across the country. Likewise, allowing schedules to flex a bit to accommodate holiday obligations can help support your employees’ work-life balance and build loyalty to your company.

Create a festive atmosphere

Your employees are going to appreciate your acknowledgment that the holiday season is special. Business Know-How notes that you can increase employee motivation by offering a few celebratory observances. “Secret Santa” exchanges are popular and cost-free for your company. Plus, supplying an assortment of treats and decorations that recognize all of the different holidays that are celebrated during this season can create an atmosphere of emotional warmth. If possible, schedule a holiday party during the workday, so you’ll avoid putting pressure on your employees to invest scarce personal time in work-related events.

Offer rewards and recognition

Kimberly Merriman, associate professor of management at Penn State University, points out that providing parties, gifts, and other forms of acknowledgment carries important symbolic value: “They send a message that the employment relationship is more than simply a transactional one.” A Glassdoor survey focusing on holiday recognition found that “53 percent of employees would stay at their company longer if they felt more appreciation from their boss.”

Knowing how to motivate employees is essential throughout the year, but it takes on unique importance during the holiday season. If you plan ahead, create warmth and recognize each employee’s unique contribution, you can build good will that may last until next year’s holiday season.

2 replies
  1. Duncan M.
    Duncan M. says:

    Holidays are coming, and people are more anctious to forget about work and relax. If you don’t pay close attention to how you manage the time during this period, you can end up with empty offices and unhappy employees. These three ideas can help you understand the needs of the people better. Thus, you can plan everything in advance. Furthermore, it is always an awesome idea to throw a party for the employees. Just make sure you don’t forget about their families because Christmas means spending good quality family time.

    Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] Consider It An Opportunity For Employee Recognition: The holiday party is a great opportunity to recognize employees for their hard work over the past year. This can be formal or informal: at the ESP holiday party, CEO Bob Hildreth gave recognition to employees who were celebrating ESP employment anniversaries, and also to those who more recently joined the team. However, even a more casual mode of thanks from a manager to employee can help to bolster engagement and productivity in the New Year. A recent survey found that over 50 percent of employees would stay at their company if they felt more appreciated. […]

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