How does that make you feel? Why employee mood is important

Woman Takes Employee Surveys for Employee MoraleIf you want to keep a pulse on your company’s health, you need to understand how engaged or disengaged your employees are feeling on a regular basis. It’s no longer sufficient to gauge employee satisfaction just once or twice a year. After all, if leadership, employee morale, or performance problems aren’t solved quickly, they can lead to a drop in productivity, job satisfaction, and customer service. Big data and frequent employee surveys are a great way to measure employee mood and satisfaction in real time.

Why companies need to understand their workforce

There’s a reason world-class companies are constantly assessing employee satisfaction: engaged employees are the engine that fuels growth, great ideas, and customer satisfaction.
It’s important to remember that employee engagement directly relates to the success of an organization. Would employees recommend other skilled people in the industry for a job at your company? Do they project a positive image when dealing with your clients and customers? Do employees feel they can openly approach supervisors with suggestions? If you don’t know the answer to these questions, then disengaged employees might negatively impact your business without you realizing it.

Stay on top of employee needs every day

Businesses are using real-time data to track their markets, their customers’ behaviors, their advertising performance, and more. So why don’t we start applying this same level of analysis to tracking employee engagement? Forget annual surveys: you should be measuring engagement on a weekly, if not daily, basis.

Frequent employee surveys will allow you to track the effects of changes in your business, such as new system implementation, changes in management, changes in company structure, or anything else that might affect engagement and morale.

Make smart changes based on employee feedback

Employee surveys are an excellent way to keep managers informed. Gather feedback on a variety of your business practices, including training, onboarding, work environment, leadership effectiveness, systems, and more. This feedback will empower you to take a data-driven approach to improving your processes, evaluating your leadership team, and improving employee engagement.

It’s also worth using survey data to influence business decisions. Will employees react positively to a merger? What benefits do they actually want? What do they think about your company’s new growth strategy? These are the kinds of important questions a survey can answer quickly to keep your business on track.

Building a business case: How to convince your company it’s time for a social recognition program

By now, you’ve heard the news: employee engagement is a huge challenge for the modern workforce. As a result, businesses are dealing with high turnover rates, absenteeism, low performance numbers, and loss of customers.

Studies have revealed that employee recognition is one of the top drivers of engagement, so for many HR professionals, recognition seems like the silver bullet.

Brandon Hall Employee Engagement Social Recognition

 

In fact, in 2014, Brandon Hall Group discovered that companies that invest in social recognition programs see a 96% employee participation rate in engagement efforts, versus only 38% participation with other types of engagement programs.

Despite the growing evidence in favor of these programs, implementing a robust social recognition strategy can be daunting. You need to get buy-in from your executives, compensation managers, IT, and people leaders before you can introduce new technology. And once you’ve launched, you need enthusiasm from leadership before you can expect adoption from your employees.

So how do you convince key stakeholders that social recognition is a smart business move? Executives are concerned about cost, effects on performance, and effects on the bottom line. Compensation managers are concerned about cost and analytics. IT is concerned about security and implementation. Managers are concerned about ease of use. An effective business case should speak to each one of these needs.

Before you start building your business case, ask yourself these questions to determine how you’re going to vet a social recognition solution:

  • What’s your budget for social recognition technology and employee rewards?
  • What pricing model is preferable for your organization?
  • What will implementation require?
  • How will this program align with your other talent initiatives?
  • How will you measure the program’s effect on engagement, retention, and productivity?

When you’re assessing potential solutions, keep in mind that true social recognition is more than just a traditional rewards or incentives program. “Social” recognition involves peer-to-peer acknowledgement, which fosters a sense of community among your teams. Employees are no longer operating in silos, motivated exclusively by large monetary incentives; they’re supporting each other’s accomplishments with public praise and encouragement. This shift in team behavior can transform the culture of your business.

Brandon Hall Group has compiled two independent reports that will give you the tools and information you need to properly vet, pitch, and implement a social recognition solution that will transform your business.

Are you ready to get started? Download their two-part research series right here:

Social Recognition Solutions

Life in the shadows: Don’t let one star employee outshine your team

Social Recognition for Introverted EmployeesIt’s easy to recognize the employees that talk the loudest or most often, but are they the only ones with something to say? What about those deep thinkers who enjoy creative time alone or in silence? Which social recognition strategies should you use to bring out the best in all of your employees, including those who don’t fight to be heard?

The extrovert often gains energy and insight while spending time with others. They feed on the interaction and thrive in a collective atmosphere. An introvert comes up with solutions and ideas most easily in a quiet environment, often alone, with time to think deeply. They can be good at spotting flaws in an otherwise accepted line of thinking.

These differences can lead to hearing only half of the available employee ideas. Here are some simple ways to be sure that you’re engaging all of your employees:

Give introverts time to think

Provide an agenda or information about what will be discussed at the next staff meeting. An extrovert may brainstorm solutions on the spot, but having a list of meeting goals and topics ahead of time will motivate an introvert to bring their ideas to the table. If you can give even an hour’s notice before a meeting, your introverted staff members will have a better chance to contribute what might be a critical solution for your company.

Facilitate employee interaction

Foster low-pressure opportunities for your employees to mingle throughout the day. Common spaces in the office can give employees who might not otherwise communicate the chance to interact. Create open areas with comfortable seating, snacks, and coffee, where people can talk and collaborate. You might just lure an introvert into interacting with other team members more regularly. It’s far easier to speak up at meetings if you’re familiar with fellow employees. It’s also easier for extroverts to encourage ideas from the introverts they’re getting to know on a casual basis.

Offer social recognition

Consistent recognition is valuable to all employees, both introverted and extroverted. Your outgoing employees might relish public praise in a meeting, whereas your introverted employees may prefer to receive a personal message that doesn’t put them on the spot.

Social recognition platforms give you a way to publicly praise all of your employees on a consistent basis, and they can help managers track who they’re recognizing and how often. This is a great way to ensure that the recognitions are distributed to the people who most deserve them – not just the people the people who command the most attention.

3 powerful ways to improve your employee retention rate

Employee Retention StrategiesPeople are often told that they should find a job they love. Unfortunately, circumstances don’t always allow the luxury of waiting for that one dream position. And some people think they’ve found their dream job, only to find that things start to go sour. There are a lot of reasons this can happen: a bad boss, a toxic team, stagnant career growth, or lack of recognition.

Losing your employees to resignation is an expensive problem. The better you can retain your employees, the better you’ll be able to save money, and more importantly, save the knowledge and talent your employees bring to the table.

A competitive salary is the bare minimum that you need to provide to keep employees satisfied. Beyond compensation, your employee retention strategies should factor in the total rewards package you offer, the quality of your leadership, and the power of your social recognition strategies.

Making sure your employees are thoroughly engaged should be a key step in your employee retention strategy. Here are 3 practical ways to start:

  1. Offer a generous and unique benefit package

Competitive wages will always be an important factor in retaining high-quality employees. In today’s employment market, individuals are also placing a high value on the benefits an employer offers. Health insurance coverage and paid vacation time are considered standard, so going above and beyond that minimum can go a long way toward improving your retention rate. Flexible work schedules, work-from-home opportunities, generous maternity and paternity leave, and paid fitness club memberships are just some of the popular benefit options that communicate value with today’s workforce.

  1. Emphasize leadership within a team – not “boss” and employees

A “boss” who cracks the whip does not encourage loyalty. A team leader who works side by side with those they lead is more likely to generate the commitment and attitude you’re looking for. If you invest in your managers to ensure they’re well trained, you’re investing in your employee retention as well. Good managers will train and inspire their team, and they will help their direct reports find their strengths and grow their careers.

  1. Appreciation and recognition go the distance

Finally, showing recognition and gratitude go a long way toward making an employee feel appreciated. Make sure you have a rewards and recognition strategy in place across your organization. Encourage managers to give their reports positive feedback on a regular basis, and foster a culture where peers are encouraged to recognize each other for good work. Regular, authentic recognition within your teams will help your employees feel more engaged, valued, and aligned with the organization. Make sure every employee knows that their work is meaningful to the company.

Don’t let high employee turnover hurt morale or your business’ bottom line. Smart employee retention strategies will help you keep your employees engaged, activated, and working toward your business’ goals.

Three ways to recognize your admins on Administrative Professionals Day and throughout the year

Most companies realize that their administrative staff members are essential contributors to day-to-day operations, and that Administrative Professionals Day is a great way to show them some appreciation. But keeping your admins engaged takes more than just a vase of flowers one day a year; it requires continual recognition and appreciation for all of the hard work that they do, even though much of it takes place behind the scenes.

Even if employee recognition is new to your organization, there are several Administrative Professionals Day ideas that you can use any time of the year to keep these essential staff members engaged.

  1. Foster community with a celebration

Why not take some time during the workday to show appreciation? Order a custom cake and let the whole office celebrate and show their appreciation for the support provided by your admin team. This type of community building can go on throughout the year by celebrating birthdays and/or work anniversaries during the workday. Taking an hour out once a month (or even once a week!) for such gatherings can have a great payoff: it leads to more collaboration by allowing your employees social time to get to know each other and share ideas.

  1. Personalize it

Nothing communicates thoughtful attention more than a recognition that’s personalized for the individual. That’s right: that means no more company-branded mugs as a reward for good work. Employees need something more individualized to make them feel known and appreciated. Work with your admin team managers to come up with personalized gift ideas. One person may love flowers, one may love a box of chocolates, and one may love a Starbucks gift card. And the best thing you can do is include a thoughtful note with each gift that clearly recognizes that employee’s strengths and contributions. These are great ideas for Administrative Professionals Day, but they can be used throughout the year when some special recognition is in order.

  1. Take them out of the office

Another Administrative Professionals Day idea is to arrange for some fun time for the entire administrative team outside of the office. You can coordinate coverage of their basic responsibilities while they’re gone to help make the activity especially relaxing. It could be a pizza party at the bowling alley or a group spa day with a massage for each. These types of team getaways offer reward along with the benefit of encouraging personal engagement in a relaxed environment.

A company can never go wrong when expressing gratitude or appreciation for a job well done. It’s great to recognize your admin staff on their special day, but small efforts throughout the year can go a long way toward keeping your employees engaged.

Want to make recognition part of everyday life for your employees? Achievers can help.

Achievers Administrative Professionals Day Ideas

 

4 Links to inspire greatness during employee appreciation week—and all year long

2015_EAW-05What is greatness? Your employees and colleagues are doing great things every day, and the only way to keep them motivated to keep up the great work is to recognize them for it. If you haven’t already, it’s time to start recognizing the greatness in your fellow colleagues today!

As we close out Employee Appreciation Week 2015, here are a few articles to help inspire you to recognize greatness today, and every day!

How to inspire greatness: stop leadingInc.

13 epic battle speeches that will inspire greatnessMashable

These 4 feelings could hold you back from greatnessEntrepreneur

The complexity of greatness: beyond talent or practiceScientific American

 

Have you recognized greatness today?

3 Links to drive results during employee appreciation week—and all year long

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Eventually, it all comes down to results. While the journey is definitely important, it’s also crucial to measure how that journey leads us to success. Recognizing success within your organization has a fantastic side effect; it encourages even more success.

Appreciating employees is an everyday thing here at Achievers, and in honor of Employee Appreciation Week 2015, we thought we’d share some of our favorite links on getting results to inspire recognition—and results—today!

5 Unconventional habits that’ll make you successfulThe Daily Muse

Micro vs macro: Using “success factors” to manage your team99U

7 Scientifically proven ways to achiever better success in lifeInc.

 

How are you recognizing your colleagues for Employee Appreciation Week?

3 reasons your mobile app shouldn’t mirror your desktop application

By Justin Rutherford, National Account Executive, Achievers

mobileA couple of years back, I downloaded one of the most popular CRM apps for iOS thinking this was going to triple my productivity, “Now I can work while on the train to the office. This is awesome!” But I quickly realized the app was less than I’d hoped for. It was clunky and difficult to navigate. After several attempts to squeeze even an ounce of value out of the tool, it was promptly deleted and I haven’t attempted using it since.

Now when prospective customers ask me, “can the Achievers native apps do everything that the desktop version can?” my immediate response is, “Why would you want to burden your employees with that kind of experience?”

And this isn’t unique to this particular company. Many organizations evaluating enterprise applications are overlooking some basic needs for users when determining what to put in front of their employees. Although I’m not a developer, I’ve tested my fair share of apps. As someone who frequently has conversations with HR leaders on the topic, here’s where organizations are missing the mark with their enterprise apps:

1.  Feature overload

Think about the consumer applications that have been wildly successful from the start. Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter. Their focus from day one has been a delightful, wholly native mobile experience. Product design for each is focused on doing one thing really well; sharing photos, newsfeed of mini blog posts respectively. Over the years they’ve compounded their initial success, slowly layering-on features that continue to enhance that experience.

But that isn’t what I experienced with my CRM app. It was packed with “features” that were more congesting than they were useful. Because it was so overloaded, it was frustrating and difficult to navigate.

Ray Wang did a great job cataloging what many of us have experienced with business applications on our mobile devices. He notes that first and second generation mobile experiences failed us,

Instead of crafting new experiences, first and second-generation apps, mostly mimicked the same experiences as the systems of transaction they replaced.

Lightbulb moment. We don’t need everything from desktop versions of software on our apps. If we’re on the move and using our phones, that probably means we just need some of the basics to “get it done.” Look at email apps for example. They’re pretty basic. Read, reply, draft and send. And you know what? That’s all we need when we’re away from our desks. The complicated things can wait until we’re back at our desks.

If enterprise apps released themselves from the shackles of desktop replication, their customers would have a much more productive, enjoyable mobile experience.

2. Utilization and adoption

I can tell you the top five apps that I open up daily, why they fit into my routine, and what value I derive from them personally and socially. Now take a look at what business applications are on your phone today. I’d wager a bet that email is the only one that sees any serious traffic on a regular basis. Why is this?

If a tool isn’t useful to the majority of your workforce, they’re not going to use it. My CRM company didn’t factor in how different users would most value the app, so it was targeted at a small, specific user persona, essentially alienating everyone else—including me.

Take stock of what your employees are using, and figure out how to cater to as many of them as possible. If you’re having trouble identifying value in business apps across the organization, it’s because too few employees are deriving meaningful value from the tools they’re provided.

For HR leaders, the biggest task is to be champions and enablers of culture. A big piece of that monstrous, constantly shifting puzzle—empowering individual contributors and people leaders with the right tools to execute on engagement and leadership strategies. At scale. If what you’re putting in front of them isn’t enabling this to happen, employees will continue to cobble together what they need to get the job done.

If done correctly, utilization and adoption doesn’t become a means to an end for enterprise tools, as in, “I have to use this tool because HR says I have to” but a natural result of users finding the app makes their lives easier.

3. The user experience

In a world of system overload, well documented by Josh Bersin, software tools find they become lost in the mix, plagued with 30% adoption rates across the organization. Demand for employees’ attention comes from so many directions, so when it’s difficult to see immediate value, they’ll quickly move on.

My CRM app was anything but enjoyable to use. I was frustrated with the first tap, and was more inclined to write a scathing review in the App Store than ever use it again. They could learn from companies like Evernote, who continues to deliver a positive user experience. They lured me with it’s simple to use note-taking feature, and over time, I discovered new uses that made the mobile experience uniquely valuable, while also complimenting the broader features and functionality of the desktop version.

Mobile can’t just be a box that’s checked. The user experience must be one that employees want to use because they love the experience—not one they have to use. And the bonus side-effect of loving your mobile app, is that your users are more likely to get attached to the desktop version, too. Win win.

comscoreTalent strategies are quickly becoming people strategies. In the same way, talent focused technologies that are doing it right, are focused on the value the individual user derives from the tool. With mobile usage quickly eclipsing that of desktop, it’s more important than ever to make sure the tools you’re providing to your employees make their work life easy, connected, and seamless.

 

 

 

 

Now when prospective customers ask me, “can the Achievers native apps do everything that the desktop version can?” my immediate response is, “Why would you want to burden your employees with that kind of experience?”

 

To learn more about Achievers’ latest product release, register for our upcoming webinar, or read the press release.

 

JustinJustin shares his passion for talent strategies that deliver an employee first experience as a National Account Executive for Achievers. When he’s not poring over the latest analyst reports, Justin devotes a significant portion of his free time eating all the great food San Francisco has to offer. You can find him on Twitter and LinkedIn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 Links to inspire leadership during employee appreciation week—and all year long

2015_EAW-03

A good leader can make all the difference in a team’s success—and longevity. And one key to encouraging a culture of recognition lies within your leaders. Leaders come in all shapes and sizes, too—they’re not just managers.

Appreciating employees is an everyday thing here at Achievers, and in honor of Employee Appreciation Week 2015, we thought we’d share some of our favorite links on leadership to inspire recognition—and leadership—today!

Between Venus and Mars: 7 traits of true leadersInc.

Become a better leader by thinking like Swiss cheeseLifehacker

You don’t have to be a CEO to develop leadership qualitiesEntreprenuer

5 Ways to transform yourself into a leaderThe Daily Muse

 

How are you recognizing your colleagues for Employee Appreciation Week?

 

4 Links to inspire collaboration during employee appreciation week—and all year long

2015_EAW-02Put a few great minds in a room together and see what happens. You already have talented, motivated, and creative talent in your organization. What do you think will result when you encourage them to collaborate in new ways?

Appreciating employees is an everyday thing here at Achievers, so in honor of Employee Appreciation Week 2015, we thought we’d share some of our favorite links on collaboration to inspire recognition—and collaboration—today!

 

 

 

 

 

Are you a collaborative leader?Harvard Business Review

What jazz soloists know about creative collaboration99U

Thomas Edison’s keys to managing team collaborationFastCompmany

Standing improves group collaborationMashable

 

How are you recognizing your colleagues for employee appreciation week?